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Lifespan of a Dog: A Dog Years Chart by Breed

How Long Should You Expect Your Dog to Live?

By July 17, 2013 | See Comments

German Shepard in a field

Are you wondering what the usual life expectancy of your dog is? Lifespan for dogs varies from breed to breed. Find out what the average lifespan of your dog is here.

HOW LONG DO DOGS LIVE

Breed and Longevity

Dog Breeds That Live the Longest

Talking about dog lifespan might just make you wonder about adopting or buying a dog breed that naturally lives longer. The lifespan of a dog is influenced a lot by food habit and care. However, genetics do play a crucial role. To help you get home a pet pal who is genetically tuned to live longer, here’s a list of the top 5 dog breeds with the longest lifespans.

Breed

  1. New Guinea Singing Dog
  2. Chihuahua
  3. Toy Poodle
  4. Jack Russell Terrier
  5. Cockapoo

Temperament

  • Friendly, Howler
  • Courageous, Playful
  • Peace-loving, Playful
  • Courageous, Energetic
  • Highly Affectionate, Energetic

Lifespan

  • 18 Years
  • 17 Years
  • 16 Years
  • 16 Years
  • 16 Years

It’s okay not to recognize the breed with the longest average lifespan on our sholist, the New Guinea Singing Dog. It’s a type of wild hunting dog that’s extremely rare. In fact, it’s considered as one of the world’s rarest dogs. These dogs are native to Papua New Guinea and there are only an estimated 100 pet New Guinea Singing Dogs in the world.

Longevity

Lifespan also depends on the dog breed. Mainly because some animals are prone to contracting breed-specific diseases and conditions. Smaller breeds tend to live longer.

Breed

Average Lifespan (Years)

Affenpinscher

12-14

Afghan Hound

12-14

African Boerboels

9-11

Airedale Terrier

10-13

Akbash

10-11

Akita

10-13

Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldogs

13

Alaskan Klee Kai

14

Alaskan Malamute

10-13

American Bulldog

12-14

American Eskimo Dog

12-14

American Foxhound

10-13

American Staffordshire Terrier

12-14

American Water Spaniel

10-12

Anatolian Shepherd Dog

10-13

Australian Cattle Dog

10-13

Australian Kelpie

12

Australian Shepherd

12-15

Australian Silky Terrier

11-14

Australian Terrier

12-14

Basenji

12-14

Basset Hound

11-14

Beagle

12-14

Bearded Collie

12-14

Beauceron

10-12

Bedlington Terrier

12-14

Belgian Malinois

10-12

Belgian Shepherd Dog

10-12

Belgian Tervuren

10-12

Bernese Mountain Dog

6-9

Bichon Frise

12-15

Black and Tan Coonhound

10-12

Black Russian Terrier

10-11

Bloodhound

10-12

Border Collie

10-14

Border Terrier

12-15

Borzoi

10-12

Boston Terrier

14

Bouvier des Flandres

10-12

Boxer

8-10

Briard

10-12

Brittany

12-13

Brussels Griffon

12-15

Bull Terrier

11-14

Bullmastiff

8-10

Cairn Terrier

12-14

Canaan Dog

12-13

Cane Corso

11

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

12-14

Carolina Dog

13

Catahoula Leopard Dogs

12

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

9-14

Central Asian Ovtcharkas

12

Cesky Terrier

14

Chesapeake Bay Retriever

10-13

Chihuahua

14-18

Chinese Crested

13-15

Chinese Foo

11

Chinese Shar-Pei

8-10

Chipoo

14

Chow Chow

8-12

Clumber Spaniel

10-12

Cocker Spaniel

12-15

Cockapoo

14-18

Collie

8-12

Coton De Tulears

15

Curly-Coated Retriever

8-12

Dachshund

12-14

Dalmatian

12-14

Dandie Dinmont Terrier

11-13

Doberman Pinscher

10-12

Dogue de Bordeaux

5-7

English Bulldogs

8-12

English Cocker Spaniels

12-14

English Foxhound

10-13

English Setter

10-12

English Shepherd

15

English Springer Spaniel

10-14

English Toy Spaniel

10-12

Estrela Mountain Dogs

11

Field Spaniel

12-14

Fila Brasileiros

10

Finnish Spitz

12-14

Flat-Coated Retriever

10-13

Fox Terrier (Smooth)

10-13

Fox Terrier (Wire)

10-13

French Bulldog

9-11

German Pinscher

12-15

German Shepherd 

10-12

German Shorthaired Pointer

12-14

German Wirehaired Pointer

12-14

Giant Schnauzer

10-12

Glen of Imaal Terrier

10-14

Golden Retriever

10-13

Goldendoodle

14

Gordon Setter

10-12

Great Dane

7-10

Great Pyrenees

10-12

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

10-12

Greyhound

10-13

Harrier

12-14

Havanese

12-14

Hungarian Vizsla

10-14

Ibizan Hound

12-14

Irish Setter

12-14

Irish Terrier

12-15

Irish Water Spaniel

10-13

Irish Wolfhound

5-7

Italian Greyhound

12-15

Jack Russell Terrier

13

Japanese Chin

12-14

Keeshond

12-14

Kerry Blue Terrier

12-15

Komondor

10-12

Kooikerhondje

13

Kuvasz

9-12

Labradoodle

13

Labrador Retriever

10-12

Laekenois

12

Lakeland Terrier

12-16

Lancashire Heeler

14

Lhasa Apso

12-14

Löwchen

13-15

Maltese

12-14

Maltipoo

13

Manchester Terrier

15-16

Maremma Sheepdog

12

Mastiff

9-11

Miniature Bull Terrier

11-14

Miniature Pinscher

12-14

Miniature Poodle

12-14

Miniature Schnauzer

12-14

Neapolitan Mastiff

8-10

Newfoundland

8-10

Norfolk Terrier

13-15

Norwegian Buhunds

11-13

Norwegian Elkhound

10-12

Norwich Terrier

13-15

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

11-13

Old English Sheepdog

10-12

Otterhound

10-13

Papillon

12-15

Parson Russell Terrier

13-15

Peekapoo

13

Pekingese

12-15

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

11-13

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

11-14

Pharaoh Hound

11-14

Pit Bull

12-14

Plott

11-13

Pointer

11-15

Polish Lowland Sheepdog

10-14

Pomapoo

13

Pomeranian

12-16

Poodle (Standard)

12-15

Portuguese Water Dog

10-14

Pug

12-15

Puli

10-15

Rat Terrier

16

Redbone Coonhound

11

Rhodesian Ridgeback

10-12

Rottweiler

8-11

Saint Bernard

8-10

Saluki

12-14

Samoyed

10-12

Schipperke

13-15

Schnoodle

13

Scottish Deerhound

7-9

Scottish Terrier

11-13

Sealyham Terrier

11-13

Shetland Sheepdog

12-14

Shiba Inu

12-15

Shih Tzu

11-14

Siberian Husky

11-13

Silky Terrier

11-14

Skye Terrier

12-14

Snorkie

12

Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier

12-14

Spinone Italiano

12-14

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

12-14

Standard Schnauzer

12-14

Sussex Spaniel

11-13

Swedish Vallhund

13

Thai Ridgeback

12

Tibetan Mastiff

11-14

Tibetan Spaniel

14

Tibetan Terrier

12-15

Toy Fox Terrier

13-14

Toy Manchester Terrier

14-16

Toy Poodle

12-14

Treeing Walker Coonhound

12-13

Vizsla

10-14

Weimaraner

10-13

Welsh Springer Spaniel

12-15

Welsh Terrier

12-14

West Highland White Terrier

12-14

Whippet

12-15

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

12-14

Xoloitzcuintle

13

Yorkie-Poo

14

Yorkshire Terrier

14-16

Common Signs of Aging in Dogs

Numbers of years lived is not an ideal determinant of aging, especially when it comes to dogs. Mainly because a 9-year-old Chihuahua is usually quite active while a Great Dane at that age would be highly lethargic and show definite signs of aging. Identifying the signs of aging is quite important as it helps pet parents to add special supplements, regulate exercise duration, and increase the frequency of veterinary visits. To help you smoothly transition from regular dog care to specialized elderly care, here’re the most common signs of aging in dogs.

Cloudy Eyes/Vision Problems:A general deterioration of vision and cloudy haze over the dog’s eyes.

Frequent Urination: Increased frequency of urination is often an indication of kidney-related health issues, which usually affects elderly dogs.

Confusion:A change in behaviour, which generally includes short-tempered nature, dementia, and confusion.

Difficulty Getting Up:Health issues such as arthritis, hip dysplasia is common among elderly dogs, which often make it difficult for them to get up.

Weight Gain/Loss:Due to change in the metabolic rate, thyroid-related issues, or dietary insufficiency elderly dogs can become overweight or underweight.

General Lethargy:Much like humans, elderly dogs increasingly become lethargic with age. They are often reluctant to play and run around.

Fatty Lumps:Elderly dogs often develop fatty lumps on their skin called lipomas. These are benign and painless tumors that usually affects old dogs.

Frequent and Deeper Sleep:Elderly dogs can spend a lot of time sleeping. Often unresponsive to sounds and disturbances they usually experience a deeper slumber.

Converting Dog Years Into Human Years

As much as we want them to dogs simply do not live as long as humans. Unfortunately, this means we often are forced to endure the heartbreak of dealing with the death of our beloved pets. Now, you may have heard that 1 dog year equals 7 human years. However, that formula delivers a casual approximation at best.

Bluey, the oldest dog ever was an Australian Cattle Dog who died at an age of 29 years 5 monthsVs
Jean Louise Calment of France died in 1997 who was the oldest person to have ever lived with an age of 122 years and 164 days.

If we take 29 years of the oldest dog Bluey and 122 years of Jean Louise Calment and perform the same calculation, we get 1 human years equalling 4.2 dog year. It’s easy to see that the popularly believed 7-year theory doesn’t always hold up.

This is simply because there are more than a few factors that can determine the lifespan of a dog.The size of the animal is an important determinant. It’s seen that smaller dogs usually live longer than the large breeds. It’s also important to note that a dog reaches maturity much faster.

In terms of rate of maturity, a dog’s 1st year is more like 15 years for humans.

A good approach to convert dog-years to human-years is to find out the average lifespan of the breed and the average life expectancy of humans in your country.

If you own an Akita in Japan, then your dog’s 1 year equals your 6.9 years

(Average human life expectancy in Japan is 83.1 years and the dog breed Akita has an average lifespan of 12)

If you own a Rottweiler in The United States, then your dog’s 1 year equals your 8.7 years

(Average human life expectancy in the US is 78.74 years and the dog breed Rottweiler has an average lifespan of 9 years)

HOW TO ENSURE THAT YOUR DOG 
LIVES A LONG AND HEALTHY LIFE

Factors Influencing Life Expectancy Of Dogs

As a responsible pet parent, your primary goal is to ensure your dog lives a happy, healthy, and long life. Now, you already know that life expectancy of dogs depends on size and specific-breed. However, there are some factors you can control that may increase your dog’s lifespan. Simple habits and effective medical care can work in favor of your dog’s health by boosting its immunity and keeping diseases at bay. While death is an inevitable climax of all life, you can do your part to ensure your dog remains active and healthy for as long as possible. This is exactly why we bring you our list of 7 factors that can influence life expectancy of dogs.

Eliminate Overfeeding:

If you think feeding your dog a ‘little’ more won’t hurt then think again. Obesity makes dogs susceptible to heart diseases and other life-threatening conditions. According to a study, Labradors fed 25% less lived at an average 2 years longer than dogs who were given more food.

Get Them Neutered:

Neutering helps in warding off certain life-threatening diseases and can potentially increase your dog’s lifespan by 1 to 3 years. This simple medical procedure can keep diseases such as testicular cancer, uterine cancer, breast cancer, and prostrated problems at bay.

Keep Your Dog’s Teeth Healthy:

Poor dental health can potentially release harmful bacteria into the dog’s bloodstream . Maintain a proper dental care routine using proper dog toothpaste and brush.

Give Them The Regular Dose of Exercise:

Talk to a veterinarian to find out how much exercise your dog needs. A daily dose of exercise keeps the heart healthy and boosts immunity.

Take Them to the Vet for Regular Check-ups:

Early detection of illnesses can prove to be the difference between life and death. Take your pet to the vet at least once every 6 months for thorough check-ups.

Don't Create a Stressful Atmosphere:

Keep your dog protected from factors that induce panic and stress. This will reduce the secretion of stress hormones and help boost immunity.

Don’t Buy Questionable Dietary Products and Supplements:

Buy supplements and dog food that are manufactured by reputed pet care companies. At PetCareRx, we feature FDA-approved dog food brands and supplements that are manufactured by some of the most respected pet care companies on the planet.

Things That Can Boost Your Dog's Immunity and Heath

We talked about habits and measures that can help increase your dog’s life expectancy. While those are equally important, some specific food items can strengthen your dog’s immunity and health. We at PetCareRx, understand the importance of providing a well-balanced meal of high-quality kibble, supplements, and natural food.

Unsweetened Yoghurt:

Curd is a great source of probiotic, which can keep your pooch’s gastrointestinal system in shipshape. Yoghurt is also one of the best sources of calcium. When buying yoghurt always choose the unflavoured and unsweetened variety.

Glucosamine and Chondroitin:

Glucosamine and Chondroitin have great cartilage rebuilding properties. They are great for improving joint health and as preventive joint care supplements. At PetCareRx, we feature all the top Glucosamine and Chondroitin products.

Fish Oil:

Both natural and supplementary forms of fish oil is known to improve cardiac health and boost immunity. Apart from improving immunity, fish oil also helps in combating inflammation and it can add a healthy shine to your dog’s coat.

Peppermint:

Both natural and supplementary forms of fish oil is known to improve cardiac health and boost immunity. Apart from improving immunity, fish oil also helps in combating inflammation and it can add a healthy shine to your dog’s coat.

Coconut Oil:

Coconut oil comes with a whole range of health benefits. It prevents skin related problems, acts as a digestive aid, and even lowers the chances of diabetes. Virgin coconut oil supplements can also be applied on skin rashes and dry spots.

COPING WITH THE LOSS OF YOUR BEST FRIEND

6 Ways to Overcome the Sorrow of Losing a Pet Dog

Dealing with the loss of a pet dog is no less traumatic than losing a human family member. The death of a pet can be devastating news which can push pet parents towards clinical depression or worse. A sudden loss of a pet can hit pet owners with a whole range of emotions right from immense sadness to feelings of regret and guilt. Following are a few suggestions on how to deal with the heartbreak of losing your beloved pet pal.

Talks to People Who Have Been in This Situation: Surround yourself with dog lovers who can empathize and help you through the pain. Seek out people who have lost their pets in the past and learn how they overcame the pain and restarted their lives.

Accept the Grief and Don't Be Ashamed to Express It: One of the biggest steps to cope with the sorrow is to acknowledge its existence. Don’t subdue your feelings instead express it openly by letting the tears out.

Don't Allow Anyone to Belittle Your Grief: The sorrow associated with losing a pet is a genuine emotion and you should not let anyone tell you otherwise. For someone who has never lost a pet, it’s difficult to understand what you are going through. Express your grief and move on at your own pace.

Consider Organizing a Memorial: Calling a few pet loving friends for a small gathering may help you deal with the pain. Keep the guest list short and only include people who love dogs or had a loving connection with your pet.

Don’t Ignore Your Health: Even though it may seem impossible but try to maintain a healthy routine. Make sure you continue to eat healthily and get your daily 8 hours of sleep.

If Required Speak to a Doctor: You should consider seeking help from a professional if you think the grief is compromising your physical and mental health.

SHOW COMMENTS
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  • Vic Irvin

    10/24/2013 4:50:19 PM

    Oh! Least you forget the intelligent Australian Shepard....Why leave the breed out?

    • mares_nest

      10/31/2013 12:59:41 PM

      The Australian Shepherd is on the list.

    • Guest

      2/7/2014 12:32:27 AM

      Aussies are wonderful! They have a lot of energy and need to be challenged because they are so strong and bright. Just wonderful.

  • Avid reader

    10/30/2013 12:48:47 PM

    Some of these are not purebred. Mongrels lifespan can be reported?

    • BlueVibe

      2/5/2014 8:40:25 PM

      Similar to whatever breeds make them up. As a general rule, though, the larger the dog, the shorter the lifespan.

  • Name

    10/30/2013 11:48:11 PM

    You left out Australian Koolies which can llive into their late teens

  • Tilo

    10/31/2013 12:57:54 AM

    What about a coonhound? A Treeing Walker Coonhound specifically.

    • Kat at PetCareRx

      11/1/2013 7:28:35 PM

      Good question, Tilo -- we just added them to the list!

  • cdmthomas

    1/26/2014 5:03:46 PM

    I have an Icelandic Sheepdog-35 lbs and she is 16 years old and walks twice a day and plays with her toys... Her grandmother lived until 17 years old. Their lifespan is supposed to be 12-14 years, but just like people there is no exact expiration date!

  • Jim

    1/27/2014 5:07:20 PM

    What about the Cockapoo?

    • Kat at PetCareRx

      1/30/2014 3:34:58 PM

      Hi Jim,
      We just added them to the chart -- they live around 14-18 years.

  • ChloeMac

    2/4/2014 3:10:46 PM

    How about the American Cocker Spaniel?

    • Kat at PetCareRx

      2/5/2014 4:50:56 PM

      Hi Chloe, We've just added them! See "Cocker Spaniel."

  • Rob M.

    2/4/2014 9:40:26 PM

    My beloved dog is almost 17.. a mix of Lab, border, and whippet, at least I think she is.. up to recent months she has been amazingly healthy, year in and year out... now her hearing is mostly gone, eyesight is half gone, her hind legs are a little weak tho she still gets around well, and she needs more frequent potty breaks and shorter stints outdoors...but she still loves to play/bark/socialize and acts like the happy dog she's always been since I rescued her 15+ years ago! Not looking forward to the day she starts really fading. :-(

  • darla_cooks

    2/5/2014 6:02:08 PM

    no standard poodle on the list?

    • PetCareAmy

      2/6/2014 6:19:00 AM

      The Standard Poodle is listed under Poodle, with a lifespan of 12-15 years.

      • darla_cooks

        2/7/2014 1:25:50 AM

        standard poodle is a totally different dog than a little one. but okay, it's your list. respect.

        • PetCareAmy

          2/7/2014 2:29:32 AM

          The smaller poodle is listed separately as "toy poodle" and "miniature poodle." We've added "standard" next to the word "poodle" in the list to clarify that the basic poodle listing does not refer to the smaller dog.

  • BlueVibe

    2/5/2014 8:40:04 PM

    Our two American Eskimo dogs lived to be 13 1/2 and 17-ish. The second one must have had genes of iron; she was like a young dog until the last year of her life.

  • Guest

    2/7/2014 12:36:38 AM

    They are all here for such a short time and how enriched my life as been during those times.

  • siestaqh

    2/17/2014 12:10:34 AM

    I had a miniature poodle who was 23.5 years old when she died. Her sight and hearing had diminished, but she still got around until the last few days when her heart finally gave out. I had a springer spaniel who was almost 18 years old when she passed on. Many times they surprise you...

  • Ulas

    3/2/2014 9:44:16 AM

    Do you have a similar chart for cat breeds?

  • getbackjack

    3/2/2014 1:30:54 PM

    Is Sheltie the same as Shetland Sheep Dog?

  • Corgi Lover In Foothills of SC

    3/3/2014 3:38:27 AM

    what about a corgi???

    • Corgi Lover in Foothills of SC

      3/3/2014 4:09:45 AM

      Just found them on the list!!! Thanks!!!

  • Klaus Fischer

    3/7/2014 6:52:23 PM

    my little Papillon passed away this year at 18+, she was the runt of the litter and never weighed more than 4.5 lbs. She was never sick 1 day, and we loved her dearly.

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