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The Average Lifespan of a Cat Breed by Breed Chart

From Siamese to Domestic Cat Breeds

By March 04, 2014 | See Comments

Old cat sitting on stone steps

Cats come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. As such, different cat breeds have different life expectancies. The average lifespan of a cat depends on a lot of variables -- from diet and exercise to their overall health to their breed. To get a better idea of your cat’s expected lifespan, check out this list of cat breeds and average ages.

Just like dogs, cats come in a number of different breeds, each with their own unique set of characteristics. Some cat breeds are big, some are fluffy, some are short, some are bald -- cats run the gamut. And, just like dogs, different cat breeds have different life expectancies. While a number of cat breeds are expected to live to be around 12 years of age, others routinely make it into their 20s. That’s a pretty big gap!

Your cat's lifespan is more likely to be affected by their diet, lifestyle, and whether or not they are on flea, tick or heartworm meds like Heartgard, Revolution for cats, or Advantage Multi for cats. That said, their breed’s average lifespan can be a handy piece of information to have. Here are the average lifespans of some of the most popular cat breeds.

Breed

Average Lifespan (Years)

Abyssinian

9-15

American Bobtail

13-15

American Curl

15+

American Shorthair

15-20

American Wirehair

7-12

Australian Mist

14-19

Balinese

18-22

Bengal

12-16

Birman

12-16

Blue Chartreux

12-15

Bombay

15-20

British Shorthair

12+

Burmese

16-18

Burmilla

10-15

California Spangled

9-16

Ceylon

~15

Chantilly-Tiffany

14-16

Colorpoint Shorthair

12-16

Cornish Rex

11-15

Cymric

8-14

Devon Rex

9-15

Domestic

12-14

Egyptian Mau

13-16

European Shorthair

15-22

Exotic Shorthair

12-14

German Rex

9-14

Havana Brown

12-15

Himalayan

15+

Japanese Bobtail

15-18

Javanese

10-15

Korat

15+

LaPerm

10-15

Maine Coon

12-15

Manx

8-14

Munchkin

12-14

Nebelung

15-18

Norwegian Forest

14-16

Ocicat

10-15

Oriental

10-15

Persian

15+

Pixiebob

~12

Ragdoll

12-17

Russian Blue

15-20

Scottish Fold

~15

Selkirk Rex

10-15

Siamese

15-20

Siberian

11-15

Singapura

9-15

Snowshoe

12-15

Sokoke

9-15

Somali

10-12

Sphynx

13-15

Tonkinese

10-16

Turkish Angora

12-18

Turkish Van

12-17

2016-04-15T05:30:39

"Lifespan" means typical already. To say "typical lifespan" is redundant.


2016-02-28T15:28:18

Yes, the terminology is incorrect, an average (or mean) should be a single number. They used the wrong word. But, I do believe the range is more informative for most of us. If out of a hundred cats 50 die as kittens and the other 50 live to 30, an average life expectancy of 15 would not be very useful!
In using a range, they do leave out some critical information: some measure of % expectation for that range. For my purpose I will just guess that probably 90% or more live in that range and that my 16 year old American Shorthair who shows few signs of slowing down is not a medical marvel. But that's ok- based on what I found here, I can assume we still have a good bit of time ahead of us!


2016-02-11T08:09:52

I have a seal point that is almost 20. I sure hope he sticks around. I'm happy yours is still going and thanks for the post, it gives me hope. He has a little arthritis but still loves fetching bottle caps and chasing our Florida lizards that happen to sneak in the condo. I sure will be heart broken when he checks out. Whoops...I just realized your post is a year old. I hope your both still around.


2016-01-13T21:19:29

You seem very disturbed. Calculus? Really? (lol) I love it when people lie through their teeth about their educational backgrounds, because it is so easy to catch them out on it with a simple pop quiz.

A projectile is fired vertically upward from sea level at an initial speed of 107 m/s at time t=0. Assume that g is 9.8 m/s^2.

1. What is the maximum height it attains?

2. How do you know when it has attained its maximum height?

3. What is t (in seconds) at that point?

4.What is its acceleration and position at time t=3?

I can do these problems in my head. Can you do them at all, Mr. assistant pharmacist? I'll even give you the relevant base equation in its 1-dimensional form so that it's pure Calculus and you don't have to know any Physics.

y = y₀ + v₀t + 0.5at^2


2016-01-13T17:08:50

I doubt that. And even if it's true, it's practically useless. A single number average is much more useful from a practical application standpoint.


2016-01-13T07:32:56

"Average Range" is a perfectly valid statistical concept. Doesn't have to be a single number.


2016-01-10T16:33:29

I hope your kitty is still doing well :) Tempt her with bits of plain cooked chicken (no onions or garlic or anything but salt), Royal Canin Exigent food (you can get it at the pet shop) and flavor her water with a bit of water-packed tuna juice. If she won't eat, she won't eat. My sister-in-law just lost a precious kitty at 17, which is a great age for a cat (mid-to=late-80s in "human years"), and the only symptom was that the cat refused to eat. Definitely ask the vet to give her a look-over.


2015-12-26T20:14:24

It comes down to diet and activity. Good luck keeping a cat alive for 30 years. That would be a Guinness record. As for giving milk to a cat, milk will cause diarrhea if too much is ingested. Just keep it shallow in a kitchen bowl, like what you would eat cereal out of. Be aware of when the cat is missing the litter box.


2015-10-25T11:13:36

I have a shorthair, except its fur is unusually long (for a shorthair).
Variation or a mix breed?


2015-09-04T11:43:04

An average, mathematically speaking, is a single number - not a range. That's the only thing wrong with this chart. There's nothing WRONG with giving a range, but you shouldn't call it an 'average' if you're going to give a range. The chart should probably say "Typical" lifespan instead of average lifespan.


2015-09-04T11:40:50

Milk is bad for cats. If you give them any at all it needs to be VERY little - it's highly unlikely that this is the reason for your cat's longevity. It's more reasonable to say your cat has lived this long in SPITE of the milk, not because of it.


2015-08-14T07:28:59

i have a american domestic short hair thats 28 and very active the key a little milk once a day,thats what mom says ,


2015-03-30T01:03:17

Do you take him to the vet for regular shots? I don't ... and Kayla is still healthy at the age of 24.


2015-03-04T20:37:52

I have a siamese mix that will be 24 next month..just wanted to see average age and he beat it by a couple of years as the average is 20.

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