Most Dog Parents Have ZERO Clue About These Fatal Food Items We've put together a comprehensive list below!

BY | September 17 | COMMENTS PUBLISHED BY
Most Dog Parents Have ZERO Clue About These Fatal Food Items

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Can Dogs Eat.......... :

Which “Human Foods” Dogs Can/Not Eat?

Have you ever been snacking on something, and wondered if it was safe to share with your dog? Before giving your furry best friend a morsel of your food, remember some foods can be dangerous, even fatal, to them! What foods can dogs eat or not eat? Read below to find out what is safe and what is not recommended.

Why should I include fruits and vegetables in my pet’s diet?

Your dog’s diet should be nutritionally balanced, low in fat, and age-appropriate. High in fiber-rich essential nutrients, adding fruits and vegetables can keep them strong and boost their immune system. Moderate quantities integrated at mealtimes can make healthier and low-calorie alternative snacks.

NOTE: Below answers are for the general dog population. Be conscious of effects on different breeds and ages. Be aware of all food sensitivities and health problems. If you are unsure if your dog should be eating something,make sure that you ask one of your veterinarians.

WHICH FRUITS CAN DOGS EAT?

The good news is that most fruits make delicious and nutritious treats for your dogs. Some keep their digestive system in good working order. Some even help prevent disease andhelp weight management. But there are still fruits that can be toxic for your dog or just part of the fruit.

You can be confident that fruits are one of the few “human foods” that can be healthy, tasty alternatives to dogs’ canned or dry food.




APPLE:YES

(but no seeds)

  • Whole apple

    Apples are a juicy and healthy treat that is rich in pectin, fiber, vitamin A, and vitamin C that all help digestion. Since they are low in protein and fat, apples are great for senior pups! Apples can aid in dogs’ dental and oral hygiene.

  • Applesauce

    Overall, dogs can eat applesauce without any issues. Look for brands that have no added sugar or fillers(or make your own!).

  • Apple core

    Overall, dogs can eat applesauce without any issues. Look for brands that have no added sugar or fillers (or make your own!).

How to prepare

Cut a whole apple into eatable slices. Remove the core and seeds. Give small portions due to high amounts of natural sugar. Can serve them frozen.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


BANANA:YES

  • Whole banana

    Bananas are nutritionally rich in potassium, vitamins, biotin, fiber, and copper that can make great additions to their diets. However, high in sugar content, which also makes them low in cholesterol and sodium. Given in moderation, bananas should be given as a tasty,low-calorie treat.

  • Banana peels

    Not toxic but hard to digest which may cause a blockage.

  • Plantains contain dietary fiber and some anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. They are not harmful to dogs, but should not be served raw or in large quantities.


BERRIES: YES

(See below “How To Prepare”)

  • Blueberries

    Blueberries are a superfood that is rich in antioxidants, fiber, and phytochemicals. The fruit can help your dog against cancer! Find blueberries in holistic commercial canine foods, such as The Superfood Plate.

  • Strawberries

    High-fiber promotes weight management and reduces the risk of colon cancer in dogs. Source of vitamin C for the immune system, vitamin B6 for muscle health, magnesium for a healthy heart, and omega-3 that strengthens skin and coat. Contains the enzyme malic acid that can whiten dogs’ teeth.

  • Blackberries

    Give in moderation. Large quantities may cause diarrhea and vomiting.

  • Raspberries

    Contains antioxidants. High in fiber, manganese, and vitamin C. Anti-inflammatory properties can help senior dogs with aging joints.Low in sugar and calories! However, small amounts of xylitol limit the consumption amount.

  • Cranberries

    Cranberries and dried cranberries are given in moderation since too much can lead to an upset stomach.

  • Boysenberries

    Canines can eat these exotic fruits whose seeds will not cause digestion problems. Quantities should still be moderated.

How to prepare

Remove stems and leaves. Canned and processed berries are a no-no! High sugar content could lead to canine obesity. Overeating causes unwanted stomach issues, such as diarrhea and vomiting. However, occasional berries treat good behavior in a puppy, adult, and senior dogs. Frozen, crisp, or extract forms are fine.


PEAR: YES

(but no seeds)

High in copper, vitamins C and K, and fiber. It's been suggested that the fruit can reduce the risk of having a stroke by 50%.

How to prepare

Cut into edible bites. Remove the pits and seeds. Canned pears are a no-no (See below about “Canned fruits”).


PEACH: YES

(without the pit)

Peaches are stone fruits that are great summer treats that contain high levels of fiber and vitamin A that help fight infections. However, peach pits pose a choking hazard, and traces of cyanide make them toxic. If the pit is consumed, look out for symptoms, such as dilated pupils,erratic behavior, drooling, or dizziness.

How to prepare

Remove pits! Serve small amounts of cut-up, bite-sized pieces of fresh or frozen peaches to prevent choking and obstructions.Canned peaches are a no-no (See below about “Canned fruits”).


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


PLUM: NO

Plums are one of the several fruits that contain hydrogen cyanide, which is extremely toxic to dogs if consumed.The plum’s foliage and roots cause gastric irritation and possibly respiratory distress. This stone fruit’s pit is also toxic, as said before.


APRICOT: YES

(without the pit)

Apricots are stone fruits and exotic fruits that are safe to eat by dogs in moderation. Make sure that the pits and seeds are removed!


CHERRY: NO

With exception to the fleshy part around the poisonous pit, cherry plants contain cyanide that disrupts blood cellular oxygen transport and is toxic to dogs. If the pit is consumed, look out for cyanide poisoning symptoms, such as dilated pupils,difficulty breathing, and red gums.


NECTARINE: YES

(without the pit)

Nectarines are a sweet and nutritious summer fruit that is rich in vitamins A and C, magnesium, potassium, and dietary fiber.

How to prepare

Remove pits! Serve small amounts of cut-up, bite-sized pieces of fresh or frozen peaches to prevent choking and obstructions.Canned peaches are a no-no (See below about “Canned fruits”).


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


ORANGES AND OTHER CITRUS FRUITS: YES

(without the pit)

Oranges and other citrus fruits can make great additions to their diets. High in vitamin C, these kinds of fruits boost the immune system and help with everyday functions. These fruits also contain anti-inflammatory properties that may help with weight management. Be careful, because they can also cause upset stomachs.

  • Orange

    Oranges are fine for dogs to eat, but they may not be fans of any strong-smelling citrus. Oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C,potassium, and fiber, and in small quantities, the juicy flesh of an orange can be a tasty treat for your dog.

  • Orange peels

    Orange peels are not toxic, however, they can become lodged in your dog’s digestive tract, causing an obstruction and requiring surgery to correct. Therefore, dogs should not eat the orange's peel, the white film on the orange's flesh, or any other orange plant part.

  • Lemon and lime

    Small amounts of lemon or lime juice are fine for dogs.

  • Grapefruit

    A dog may eat grapefruit flesh but the citric acid can create digestive problems, such as loose stool, vomiting, diarrhea, etc.

  • Cranberries

    Cranberries and dried cranberries are given in moderation since too much can lead to an upset stomach.

  • Clementines, mandarins, and tangerines

    See above.

How to prepare

Peel citrus fruits to avoid intestinal obstruction, and remove all seeds to avoid choking hazards. It's extremely important to remove all traces of skin, pith, and seeds as these parts may contain toxic compounds!


DATE: YES

(without the pit)

Dates are a delicious treat that should be given in moderation. Make sure to remove the pit.


GRAPE: NO

(except for extract)

High in copper, vitamins C and K, and fiber. It's been suggested that the fruit can reduce the risk of having a stroke by 50%.

  • Whole grape

    It is not yet known what makes grapes so toxic. Whether the fungal mycotoxin or the aspirin-like salicylate naturally found in this fruit, even one or two grapes can kill a dog! No matter the dog’s breed, sex, or age, this dangerous fruit can lead to sudden kidney failure or death.

  • Grape product

    Raisins, currants, and juice are toxic to dogs causing severe reactions.

  • Grape seed extract

    The extract is the one exception! This antioxidant can improve blood flow, ease joint inflammation, reduce diabetes symptoms, and prevent cataracts in canines.


TOMATO: NO

  • Whole tomato

    Ripe tomatoes are perfectly safe for dogs. However, the green parts of tomato plants (stems and leaves) contain a toxic substance called solanine. Large quantities of the plant would make dogs sick.

  • Tomato products

    Tomato sauce, soup, juice, and ketchup aren't particularly healthy for dogs because of the added salt and sugar, as well as artificial flavors or other chemicals they might contain. Small amounts of tomato-based products like sauce likely won't cause harm to your dog.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


CUCUMBER: YES

  • Whole cucumber

    Cucumbers are a safe, low-calorie snack that can boost energy levels. Little to no carbohydrates, fats, or oils; source of vitamins K, C, and B1 as well as potassium, copper, biotin, and magnesium. Again, given in moderation.

  • Pickles

    Veterinarians do not recommend pickles, since they are extremely high in sodium and contain ingredients that could be potentially harmful to a dog.However, pickles aren't necessarily harmful or toxic to dogs.


AVOCADO: NO

Avoid all parts of the avocado plant. From the pit to the skin to leaves to its flesh, the avocado plant contains the toxin persin, a natural fungicide that often causes harm to dogs. If consumed, watch for toxicity symptoms, including vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal sensitivity.

Dasuquin Joint Supplement contains avocado oil that both protects cartilage breakdown from unhealthy enzymes and regenerates connective tissue production.


PINEAPPLE: YES

The tropical fruit flesh is packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and enzyme bromelain that aids in protein absorption. Pineapple’s flesh can make a delicious treat for dogs and other animals.

How to prepare

Remove the prickly outside peel and crown first. Cut up into eatable chunks.


MANGO: YES

(without the pit)

The delicious summer treat contains potassium, beta-carotene, and alpha-carotene that can make great additions to their diets. The exotic fruit is packed with vitamins A, B6, C, and E. Feed occasionally to your dog due to the high sugar content.

How to prepare

Remove the hard stone pit that contains a small amount of cyanide and that poses a choking hazard.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


COCONUT: YES

(but no husks)

  • Whole coconut

    The healthiest part of the coconut is its meat. High levels of lauric acid (fatty acid) fights viruses, treats yeast infections, and decrease inflammation that can cause arthritis. Dogs can ingest it to soothe aching joints and improve skin conditions. Packed with antioxidants to boost the immune system.

  • Coconut oil

    Externally, coconut oil moisturizes dogs’ skin and coat, soothes inflammation, and promotes healing. Internally, the oil’s high levels of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) and 80% saturated fat contributes to weight gain and pancreatitis as well as GI tract irritation, inflammation,leaky gut, and chronic disease.

  • Coconut water

    The exotic beverage is safe for dogs when 100% natural and pure coconut water. Be careful with high levels of potassium.

  • Coconut milk

    Coconut milk can play a role in helping fight off viruses, preventing illness by improving the immune system, and moisturize their fur coat. Only give organic coconut milk. Non-organic can contain harmful pesticides. Processed can contain added sugar.

How to prepare

Never give your pup a whole coconut. Make sure to remove the husk/shell before giving your dog coconut, as the shell could become lodged in his esophagus and cause intestinal irritation and possible blockage. Also, its fiber content is not safe.


KIWI: YES

Kiwis contain more vitamin C than oranges and more potassium than a banana. These nutritionally beneficial fruits are available throughout the year. Even though they’re small in size, a whole kiwi contains high amounts of fiber that can result in an upset stomach and diarrhea. The skin is fine.


POMEGRANATE: YES

The tropical fruit flesh is packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and enzyme bromelain that aids in protein absorption. Pineapple’s flesh can make a delicious treat for dogs and other animals.


PAPAYA: YES

This exotic fruit is a healthy treat for dogs. Be careful of papaya seeds that contain small traces of cyanide and can cause intestinal blockage. Chop the fruit into large pieces before serving it to your dog.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


OLIVE: YES

  • Green/Purple/Black olives

    Plain, unsalted olives can be a healthy snack for your pup. Not necessary for the dog’s diet. Feed it in moderation.

  • Olive oil

    No more than one teaspoon of olive oil per 20 pounds of body weight per meal. It can be mixed in with your pup's regular fresh or dried dog food.


FIG: MAYBE

Figs contain fucosin and ficin enzymes that can irritate some dogs. One of the fruits that dogs can eat in strict moderation - 1 to 2 per week - due to their high fiber content.


MELON: YES

(without seeds)

  • Watermelon

    Dogs can consume watermelon for hydration since the flesh is 92% water. It’s a low-calorie, low sodium, fat-free, cholesterol-free, and energizing treat with fiber, potassium, and vitamins A, B6, and C. Full of the cancer-battling antioxidant lycopene and prevents skin damage.Remove rind and all seeds.

  • Cantaloupe

    Remove rind. Dogs cannot choke on the seeds, and the fruit does not cause digestion issues. This exotic fruit is packed with nutrients, low in calories, and is a great source of water and fiber. They can improve your dog’s vision. Share in moderation since cantaloupes are high in sugar.

  • Honeydew

    Remove rind and all seeds.

How to prepare

Remove melon rinds and seeds. Cut into eatable slices before serving. Melon seeds can cause intestinal blockage. The melon rind can cause gastrointestinal upset including vomiting and constipation.


EGGPLANT: YES

Raw eggplant is not poisonous but dogs may not enjoy the flavor (or lack thereof).


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


DRAGON FRUIT: YES

Dragon fruit, also known as pitaya, is not only non-toxic for dogs they are healthy for them. The tasty treat’s seeds are safe.


PERSIMMON: YES

Persimmons are full of both vitamins A and C, beneficial for a dog’s eyes and immune system. Dogs love persimmons, but make sure to feed in moderation since they can cause upset stomachs in dogs. Remove pit or seeds.


What to watch out for in FRUITS:

Don’t overdo it! Moderation will lessen ingested natural sugars, starches, and consequential gastrointestinal reactions.

Remove seeds! Small traces of cyanide poison are released when chewed or broken.

Remove stems and leaves! Stems cause gastrointestinal obstruction, and leaves are very difficult to digest.

Remove rinds and peels! These can cause a choking hazard and gastrointestinal obstruction.

Remove pits! These pose a choking hazard and toxicity due to the cyanogenic glycosides (amygdalin) inside them. If you suspect that your dog has swallowed a fruit pit, contact your veterinarian immediately and watch carefully for the signs of cyanide poisoning such as excessive drooling, dilated pupils, and erratic behavior.

Avoid canned fruit! A) Some toxic ingredients in canned fruit (such as some preservatives); B) Fruits also lose their health benefits; C) The fruit is drenched with sugary syrup which provides high sugar content that can lead to canine obesity and affect the long-term health.

Avoid processed fruits! Such products as fruit jams, fruit-flavored ice cream, or fruit-flavored syrup, are not good for dogs. Some preservatives are toxic to dogs. Artificial flavoring loses the fruit’s original health benefits. Excess sugar can lead to canine obesity.

What are good forms: Fresh, frozen fruit, and some extracts are the best ways to feed your dog. Dried fruit or fruit juice so long as there are no added ingredients. But they’re also higher in natural sugar and lower in fiber than fresh or frozen.

NOTE: As always, you can contact us anytime with your questions or concerns about your dog's health.

Can Dogs Eat.......... :

Which “Human Foods” Dogs Can/Not Eat?

Have you ever been snacking on something, and wondered if it was safe to share with your dog? Before giving your furry bestfriend a morsel of your food, remember some foods can be dangerous, even fatal, to them! What foods can dogs eat or not eat? Read below to find out what is safe and what is not recommended.

Why should I include fruits and vegetables in my pet’s diet?

Your dog’s diet should be nutritionally balanced, low in fat, and age-appropriate. High in fiber-rich essential nutrients, adding fruits and vegetables can keep them strong and boost their immune system. Moderate quantities integrated at mealtimes can make healthier and low-calorie alternative snacks.

NOTE: Below answers are for the general dog population. Be conscious of effects on different breeds and ages. Be aware of all food sensitivities and health problems. If you are unsure if your dog should be eating something, make sure that you ask one of your veterinarians.

WHICH VEGETABLES CAN DOGS EAT?

Together with vegetables, fruit can make up 10% of your dog’s diet.

carrot:YES

Carrots are crunchy, low-calorie snacks for dogs. Carrots are high in vitamin A and fiber, which can remove tartar from a dog’s teeth. Can be served cooked or raw to dogs.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


BROCCOLI:YES

(but limit consumption)

Small quantities of this fibrous dark green vegetable are a nutritional snack thatis high in fiber and vitamin C and low in fat. However, broccoli florets and stalks contain isothiocyanates, which can cause gastric irritation and esophageal obstruction in some dogs.


CELERY: YES

Celery is crunchy, low-calorie snacks for dogs. Celery is high in vitamins A, B, and C. They contain fiber and other nutrients that promote a healthy heart, dental/oral care, and even fight cancer in dogs.


CORN:YES

  • Whole corn

    Corn has a little nutritional benefit for dogs.

  • Cornbread

    Cornbread is not harmful, but owners should be aware of any gluten/wheat allergies and added sugar.

  • Popcorn

    Plain, air-popped popcorn is safe for dogs to eat in small quantities. Buttered popcorn or popcorn with other toppings is not safe for your dog regularly, although eating a few dropped pieces here and there probably won't hurt dogs.


POTATO: YES

  • Whole potato

    If you do feed your dog a potato, stick with plain varieties that are baked or boiled. Mashed potatoes are fine,but not raw potatoes! If your dog is prone to an upset stomach, a good mealtime option is plain boiled chicken and potatoes with no added ingredients.

  • French fries

    Potatoes fried in oil, such as french fries or potato chips, or potatoes with butter or salt added to them are not healthy for dogs. Giving a dog too many carbohydrates can result in obesity or other health problems.

  • Sweet potato

    Sweet potato offers dogs fiber, water, and nutrients that aid with digestive problems. Sweet potato offers even more nutritional value, containing vitamins, thiamine, niacin, and even copper. Because of these nutrients, sweet potatoes are much more beneficial to pets than regular white potatoes.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


MUSHROOMS: NO

Even though 0.1% of wild mushrooms can be toxic and lead to death, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Washed white mushrooms from the supermarket can be okay.


ONION AND GARLIC: NO

All types and forms of onions and garlic are part of a family of plants called Allium that is poisonous to most pets. Even in very minute quantities, onion and garlic can cause your dog’s red blood cells to rupture, and lead to digestive problems and food poisoning (e.g., vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, and nausea).

  • What should I do if you think your dog consumed onion or garlic?

    Take them to the emergency veterinary hospital immediately! Symptoms include gastrointestinal upset, vomiting, and anemia.Intravenous fluids may be given to help flush your dog's bloodstream, maintain proper hydration, and cause red blood cell reproduction. Dogs may need oxygen supplementation and a blood transfusion.


ASPARAGUS: NO

Asparagus is not unsafe to eat, however, there is no point in giving to dogs. Too tough to eat raw and too soft to eat cooked. It loses nutritional benefits.


CAULIFLOWER: YES

This nutritional treat is packed with vitamins and antioxidants that may help reduce inflammation and aid older pets with arthritis. Its fibrous nature can support digestive health.

How to prepare

Remove stem and leaves. Serve plain, raw or cooked, and in eatable bites. By the way, overeating can cause an upset stomach.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


LETTUCE AND OTHER GREENS: YES

  • Lettuce

    Lettuce helps add water and fiber to a pet’s diet which helps keep them hydrated and full. The leaf should be cut into very thin slices to make it easy to eat and can be placed on top of their usual food.

  • Seaweed

    Give only plain seaweed only in moderation.

  • Cilantro

    Cilantro is healthy for your dog to eat, and may help calm your dog's upset stomach or ease digestion problems. Cilantro contains vitamin A, C, potassium, zinc, and other essential minerals that are good for your dog.

  • Cabbage

    Beware of the gassy effects! Cabbage is a completely safe green treat for dogs. Serve raw, baked, stuffed, or chopped on top of their kibble. If you're gassy, you usually reach out for the Pepcid. If your dog is gassy, they reach out for Famotidine!

  • Mustard greens

    Prepared mustard greens are fine. Mustard seeds, though, are a no-no for pets as the seeds contain toxic hybrids that can lead to gastroenteritis, vomiting, diarrhea, or intestinal tract inflammation.


KALE: NO

(without the pit)

Keep it away from your dogs. Lots of pet owners have started feeding kale ribs to their dogs as a treat; but kale is high in calcium oxalate, which can cause health issues including kidney and bladder stones.


SPINACH: NO

Spinach is not the best vegetable to give to your dog. It is high in oxalic acid, which blocks the body’s ability to absorb calcium and can lead to kidney damage.


PEA: YES

Green peas, snow peas, sugar snap peas, and garden or English peas are all fine for dogs. They have several vitamins, minerals,and are rich in protein, and high in fiber. Give fresh or frozen, but avoid canned peas with added sodium.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


BELL PEPPER: YES

(but limit consumption)

All bell pepper varieties are a healthy alternative snack that provides beta carotene, fiber, and antioxidants for dogs. Bell peppers boost the immune system. Make sure to remove stems, and cut peppers up into manageable-sized pieces.


PUMPKIN: YES

Pumpkin is an ideal food to add to your dog’s diet, due to its fibrous nature that aids gastrointestinal upset, source of water, carotenoids, vitamins, and minerals. It's also a low-calorie snack! Remove seeds before steaming, roasting, or pureeing pumpkins. Avoid pumpkin pie filling, which contains added sugar and spices.


BEET: YES

Only feed cooked beets and in moderation. Beets and their greens are healthy sources of vitamin C, fiber, folate, manganese, and potassium for digestion, immune system, healthy skin, and shiny coat. Steer clear of feeding raw beets that could lead to an obstruction in the small intestine or a potential choking hazard.

  • Beet juice

    Safe and non-toxic to dogs.


ZUCCHINI: YES

Zucchini is rich in potassium, folate, and vitamin, and makes for a great and healthy snack for dogs.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


BRUSSEL SPROUT: YES

Beware of the gassy effects! Brussel sprouts are loaded with nutrients and antioxidants that are great for humans and dogs, alike. If you're gassy, you usually reach out for the Pepcid. If your dog is gassy, they reach out for Famotidine!


BEANS: YES

Beans can be a part of a dog's healthy diet as a nice treat. They are rich in fiber and have some protein, too. That means they should never be more than 10% of your dog's daily calorie intake.

  • Black bean

    Black beans are an excellent source of vitamin C, vitamin K, and manganese. They're also loaded with protein and fiber, which help to burn fat, regulate your pet's blood sugar, and strengthen their healthy immune system.

  • Green bean

    Cooked, chopped, steamed, or canned beans (with no added salt) make these a low-calorie, maximum nutrition snack for dogs.Green beans are full of important vitamins, minerals, and fiber that make these snacks also filling and satisfying. Opt for low-salt or no-salt products!

  • Chickpea

    Also known as garbanzo beans, chickpeas are safe for dogs. Keep ‘em plain. However, dogs should not be fed hummus, because of the other ingredients like onion, garlic, and high amounts of oil.

  • Edamame

    Give plain edamame beans either raw, steamed, or frozen.

  • Lentil

    Lentils contain abundant fibers, proteins, B vitamins, phosphorus, iron, zinc, and carotenoids.

  • Lima bean

    Also called butter beans, lima beans are a great source of fat-free, plant-based protein to enhance your dog's diet. They're also rich in fiber, which helps maintain blood sugar levels, especially beneficial for dogs with diabetes.


RADISH: YES

Radishes are a good source of fiber for digestion, potassium for energy, and vitamin C for the immune system. Its rough skin can also remove tooth plaque and tartar. Give in moderation.


SQUASH: YES

Your dog can enjoy plain cooked squash. Raw squash can be hard on their digestive system.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


OKRA: YES

Okra contains vitamin C, B vitamins, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and folic acid.


RHUBARB: NO

Rhubarbs cause nervous system problems, digestive tract issues, and kidney damage. Rhubarb contains oxalates, reduces a dog’s calcium, causes renal failure, and other health issues. If your dog has eaten any of these foods, take them to the vet or emergency clinic immediately.


What to watch out for in VEGETABLES:

Never feed aromatic vegetables, such as onions, garlic, or chives in all forms (e.g., cooked, raw, and even powder). These cause damage to the red blood cells, ultimately causing them to burst.

Toxic-causing vegetables are rhubarb and wild mushrooms!

Avoid canned vegetable filling!

What are good forms: Steamed, boiled, mashed up, or pureed vegetables in small quantities.

NOTE: If you are unsure if your dog should be eating something, make sure that you ask one of your veterinarians.

Can Dogs Eat.......... :

Which “Human Foods” Dogs Can/Not Eat?

Have you ever been snacking on something, and wondered if it was safe to share with your dog? Before giving your furry bestfriend a morsel of your food, remember some foods can be dangerous, even fatal, to them! What foods can dogs eat or not eat? Read below to find out what is safe and what is not recommended.

Why should I include fruits and vegetables in my pet’s diet?

Your dog’s diet should be nutritionally balanced, low in fat, and age-appropriate. High in fiber-rich essential nutrients, adding fruits and vegetables can keep them strong and boost their immune system. Moderate quantities integrated at mealtimes can make healthier and low-calorie alternative snacks.

NOTE: Below answers are for the general dog population. Be conscious of effects on different breeds and ages. Be aware of all food sensitivities and health problems. If you are unsure if your dog should be eating something, make sure that you ask one of your veterinarians.

WHICH OTHER FOODS CAN DOGS EAT?

Dogs are omnivores, meaning that they can eat both protein-packed meats and fiber-rich plant food. Even most commercial dog kibble can be a combination of plant-based matter (fruits and/or vegetables) and meat protein.


GRASS: YES

For healthy dogs and on regular parasite prevention medication, eating grass is considered safe. To keep your grass grazing dog healthy, make sure that there are no herbicides, pesticides, or fertilizers on the grass your dog nibbles. Most vets agree that eating grass probably helps soothe a dog's upset stomach.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


FISH COOKED:YES RAW NO

  • Shrimp

    Shrimp is low in fat, calories, and carbs, which is great for dogs on a diet. However, shrimp is also high in cholesterol and may be filled with harmful toxins. Occasional shrimp can be a healthy treat for dogs!

  • Crab

    Not those found on the beach! Prepared, cooked crab is safe for dogs in small amounts. It has great nutrients but is a bit higher in sodium than is good for them. Be careful because some have iodine, as well!

  • Lobster

    Lobsters must be cleaned, cooked, and removed from their shells before fed to dogs. Lobsters are full of sodium and high in fat.

  • Tuna

    Rich in protein, vitamins, and omega3 fatty acids which are extremely nutritious for dogs. They not only give strength and energy but shinier and softer fur. Mercury poisoning from tuna can accumulate in the body over time.

  • Salmon

    Salmon is rich in protein, vitamins, and omega 3 fatty acids and gives shinier, softer coats. Serve cooked salmon, not raw like in sushi. Pick dry canine foods with salmon, such as Taste Of The Wild - Pacific Stream Canine with Smoked Salmon.

How to prepare

When cooked and thoroughly cleaned of their shells and nasty bits, shrimps, lobsters, and crab can be eaten by dogs.


NUTS: DEPENDS

Generally speaking, nuts are safe for dogs to eat! Nuts are high in beneficial omega-3 fatty acids; but, nuts are also high in fat, which can cause gastrointestinal problems. Since, they are not the healthiest choice for dogs, limit intake.

  • Almond

    No! Hard to digest.

  • Almond butter

    Yes! Enjoyable treat.

  • Almond milk

    Safe! Almond milk is made from processing almonds which is fine for dogs.

  • Peanut

    Safe! Raw or plain peanuts are fine for dogs.

  • Peanut butter

    Safe! Excellent source of protein, healthy fats, niacin, vitamin B, and vitamin E.

  • Pecan

    No! High-fat and hard to digest.

  • Walnut

    English walnuts are generally safe, but black walnuts are toxic for dogs! Look out for vomiting, tremors, fever, or seizures.

  • Cashew

    Safe! Its omega-3 fatty acids moisturize a dog’s skin and coat.

  • Pistachio

    Not recommended in large quantities! Pistachios can cause gastrointestinal distress, obesity, and pancreatitis.

  • Acorn

    Dangerous! Acorns contain tannins which can cause upset tummies. Rarer consequences are kidney failure, intestinal obstruction, and even death.

  • Macadamia

    Absolutely not! Just six raw or roasted macadamia nuts will make your dog sick. If macadamia nuts are consumed by dogs, symptoms include fever, vomiting, tremors, hyperthermia, and weakness in the back legs. Keep them away from your pup!


SPICES: DEPENDS

When a pet owner provides a better-sourced, healthier diet, why not add a little flavor, right? Dogs don’t especially need spices in their food to stay healthy. Below are 6 safe spices (Y) and 6 dangerous spices (N) for dogs:

  • Onion powder (N)

    Onion and onion powder can easily upset a dog’s stomach and cause diarrhea and vomiting. Onion contains sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells, which can lead to anemia.

  • Garlic powder (N)

    Garlic is toxic for pets.

  • Salt (N)

    Doesn’t translate well to our dogs’ diet. Salt will cause increased thirst and urination, which leads to dehydration. It can also cause vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea when ingested in larger quantities. For reference, a cup of noodle soup has more than seven times the daily amount for your dog!

  • Nutmeg (N)

    Highly dangerous and surprisingly toxic spice for dogs. Nutmeg can cause severe stomach upset and agitation in the nervous system.

  • Ginger (Y)

    Ginger root contains anti-inflammatory (helping with arthritis) and antibacterial properties. Ginger can boost the digestive system, soothe nausea, and improve blood circulation in dogs. Give fresh ginger in small quantities, and larger amounts of dried or ground ginger. Ginger in canine foods improves their immune system.

  • Cinnamon (Y)

    Cinnamon contains antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and can help to counteract the effects of diabetes. The spice helps improve bad breath.

  • Basil (Y)

    This dog-approved leafy herb is rich in antioxidants with antiviral and antimicrobial properties. It can help diminish the painful effects of arthritis, elevate the mood, and provide a remedy for stress and anxiety.

  • Turmeric (Y)

    Turmeric comes from a root that provides a boost to the metabolism and helps accelerate weight loss. It provides benefits for cardiovascular, joint, and brain health. The spice can provide some relief from arthritis, and has been used to protect against cancer and anemia

  • Lavender (N)

    The plant lavender contains a toxin called linalool, which is poisonous for dogs.

  • Parsley (Y)

    Parsley contains healthy antioxidants, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. It helps improve organ function, flush toxins from the body, and improve bad breath.

  • Mint (Y)

    While your dog may love mint, it is important to not allow him to eat too many mint leaves from your yard or to give him mints created for human consumption. While most mint is not toxic to dogs, English Pennyroyal is and should always be avoided.

  • Vanilla (N)

    Vanilla extract and imitation vanilla have a high alcohol content that is toxic to your dog. Dogs can't break down alcohol in their system. Alcohol-free vanilla is safe for your dog.


SPICY FOOD: NO

Canines just aren't well-equipped for intensely spicy foods. These foods can cause excessive thirst as well as stomach problems including pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and gas.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


SWEETS: NO

Candy, gum, baked goods, some diet foods, and other products are sweetened with xylitol that would cause your dog’s blood sugar to drop and also cause liver failure! Also look out for vomiting, seizures, lethargy, and coordination issues. We recommend not feeding your dog candy or sweets at all.


CHOCOLATE: NO

Chocolate is poisonous to dogs! Dogs cannot metabolize the high amount of caffeine and theobromine (i.e., an alkaloid toxin primarily found in the cocoa plant). The chemicals’ effects speed a dog’s heart rate and stimulate the nervous system. Found in cocoa powder, unsweetened, semisweet, dark, and milk chocolate.

  • If your dog eats chocolate

    Consumption can cause a serious medical emergency. Signs of chocolate poisoning usually appear within 6 to 12 hours. Monitor your pup closely for symptoms, including heart problems, muscle tremors, seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, or collapse. Chocolate poisoning depends on the type and amount of chocolate consumed.

  • White chocolate

    White chocolate vs. other chocolates barely poses any threat of chocolate poisoning with less theobromine content per ounce of white chocolate. Dogs can still get sick from all of the high fat, which can lead to pancreatitis, and high sugar, which can lead to diabetes, weight gain, and urinary tract infections.


HONEY: YES

Honey is safe for dogs to eat in small quantities. Brush your dog’s teeth after giving honey, since sugar causes tooth decay. Raw honey should not be given to puppies or dogs with compromised immune systems.


MARSHMALLOW: NO

Marshmallows aren't good for your canine companion due to their incredibly high sugar content and calories, which makes them especially dangerous for any dog with diabetes or weight problems.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


JELLO: NO

Gelatin itself is pretty good for your dog since it's about 99 percent pure protein. However, jello is not a good choice because of the high sugar content and artificial sweeteners in it, like xylitol, that can be toxic to pups. Jello is not life-threatening for dogs, but not good either.


CAT FOOD: NO

Cat food is not ideal for dogs! Cat food tends to be high in fat, calories, and protein. Dogs with sensitive stomachs may suffer gastrointestinal upset, sickness, and diarrhea after eating cat food.


ESSENTIAL OILS: NO

Essential oils and many liquid potpourri products, including oil of cinnamon, citrus, pennyroyal, peppermint, pine, sweet birch, tea tree, wintergreen, and ylang-ylang, are poisonous to dogs - both ingestion and skin exposure.


EGGS: DEPENDS

Eggs are a rich source of protein, vitamins, riboflavin, and selenium, which are good for boosting your dog’s immune system.

  • Raw eggs

    No. Eggs must be fully cooked before fed to your dog, due to potential Salmonella and E. Coli poisoning. Raw or undercooked eggs may be contaminated with pathogenic bacteria and cause upset stomachs.

  • Eggshells

    Not recommended. Composed of a calcium-rich and highly digestive compound called calcium carbonate. The added dietary calcium could cause an imbalance in the dog's diet, which could cause chronic kidney disease (CKD) or more phosphorus in the bloodstream.

  • Scrambled eggs

    Yes. The best version of eggs to feed your dogs is fully cooked - boiled or scrambled - without additives. If eggs are scrambled with added milk, the risk of inducing diarrhea is increased, as many dogs do not tolerate dairy products well.

  • Fried eggs

    Not recommended. The added fat from oil or butter while cooking can increase the risk of an adverse reaction.

  • Hard-boiled eggs

    Yes. The best version of eggs to feed your dogs is fully cooked - boiled or scrambled - without additives.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130


MEAT: DEPENDS

The best for dogs is cooked meat without fat or bones. Because of the risks of salmonella and other foodborne illness, raw meat should not be given to dogs. Avoid giving fat or bones, which dogs can choke on.

Many dog medications are beef-flavored and chicken-flavored, such as Clomicalm, Deramaxx, Tri-Heart Plus, NexGard Chewables, Quellin (Carprofen) Soft Chewable Tablets, Credelio, and Interceptor Plus so that canines find it easier to consume with or without food.

  • Raw chicken

    Though many dog foods contain chicken as an ingredient, raw chicken is not recommended, due to the risk of salmonella or bacterial infections.

  • Raw beef

    While beef is a great source of protein and healthy fats, raw ground beef puts your dog at risk for salmonella, bacterial contamination. However, if freeze-dried raw meats seem to be nutritionally sound in a dog’s diet (e.g., Dr. Marty Nature's Blend Small Breed Freeze Dried Raw Dog Food).

  • Boiled chicken

    Many dogs regard chicken as their favorite food. It just so happens that chicken is an excellent protein source.

  • Pork/ ham/ bacon/ sausage/ pepperoni/ salami

    No! Pork is not a good source of protein. Eaten raw, undercooked, or cooked pork meat is not safe and can transmit infectious trichinella parasites (i.e., trichinosis). In terms of the other pork products, these foods are high in fat and sodium which can cause fatal risks of salt poisoning, kidney damage, or pancreatitis.

  • Turkey

    Turkey is not toxic to dogs. Turkey is an ingredient in many commercial dog foods and is rich in nutrients like protein, riboflavin, and phosphorus. When cooked plain, under the guidance of a veterinarian, it can be an essential part of a homemade dog food diet.

  • Steak

    In moderation, steak can be an excellent part of your dog's balanced diet because it's rich in protein, iron, omega-6 fatty acids, and other minerals and nutrients that a dog needs to stay healthy.

  • Rawhide/jerky

    Rawhides are common treats that owners give their dogs to chew on, but they aren't always the safest option. So long as it's a pure, naturally dehydrated, single-source protein, your dog can chow down on as much beef, bison, venison, or elk jerky his or her heart desires. Just make sure it's the right kind of jerky.

  • Fat trimmings/bones

    Fat trimmings can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and pancreatitis. Ingesting meat bones can cause a choking hazard. Cooked meat without fat or bones is best.

  • Tofu

    Tofu isn't toxic, but soy is not a complete protein for dogs. Tofu may cause gassy or bloat effects. If you're gassy, you usually reach out for the Pepcid. If your dog is gassy, they reach out for Famotidine!


DAIRY: YES

In small quantities and moderation, milk products are perfectly safe for most dogs. Some adult dogs don't have stomachs that are tolerant to lactose. Milk and milk-based products can then cause diarrhea and other digestive problems for your pup.

  • Milk

    Milk is a safe treat in small quantities. A few tablespoons of cow's milk or goat's milk on an occasional basis can be a nice reward for your dog without the side effects of overindulgence. However, too much fat in your dog's diet can lead to serious conditions such as canine obesity and pancreatitis.

  • Cheese

    You may be surprised to know that several dogs adore cheese. Be careful that your dog consumes cheese in small amounts. Excessive cheese consumption will lead to stomach upset.

  • Cottage cheese

    Plain cottage cheese can add extra protein to your dog’s diet.

  • Cream cheese

    You can feed your dog plain cream cheese, but only in small and infrequent amounts. Low-fat variety is ideal.

  • Butter/margarine

    Avoid giving your dog butter as it is mostly saturated fat and doesn’t offer any health benefits, as some other fatty oils do.

  • Ice cream

    Ice cream isn't a healthy snack option or regular treat for dogs, but not toxic!

  • Whipped cream

    Whipped cream can be safely consumed in small quantities.


LEAVENEDPRODUCTS: YES

Dogs can safely eat any leavened products but in moderation. Choose plain varieties and avoid any additives, including dairy, sweets, and tomatoes. Be aware of any wheat or gluten allergies or sensitivities! Dogs can take the antihistamine Cyproheptadine 4mg tablets to fight negative reactions to food allergies.

  • Bread

    From plain white to wheat, dogs can safely eat bread in moderation.

  • Tortilla

    Plain flour tortillas in moderation will not harm your dog. However, tortillas have minimal nutritional value.

  • Rice

    This food staple is a safe filler in commercial canine foods. Plain rice in small quantities will not harm your dog. Opt for organic white and brown rice.

  • Pasta

    Plain boiled pasta is safe and easily digestible. Limit consumption of this yummy treat for dogs. Only add safe vegetables, aka not tomatoes or tomato products.

  • Chips/pretzels

    It's not a good idea to share salty foods with your dog, which can make them seriously thirsty and other negative consequences.

  • Quinoa

    Generally yes. The edible seed in quinoa is an ingredient found in high-quality commercial dry dog kibble. Quinoa can be a healthy alternative to common allergens.

  • Graham crackers

    These can be a sweet treat, but only in moderation. Sweet treats can lead to canine obesity as well as a host of other health problems.

  • Pizza

    Be careful with tomato, onion, garlic, and dairy ingredients! Each has different issues, potentially toxicity and health problems, and excess fat is never good...just don’t give pizza to your pup, unless it has a plain crust and safe vegetables.

  • Pancakes

    Plain pancakes in moderation are unlikely to harm your dog. Don’t add butter or syrup.

  • Cereal

    Try the types that are healthier than others (aka less sugary and fattening). Cereal can be used as an occasional treat.

  • Oatmeal

    The best is the plain variety, cooked with water. When prepared properly, oatmeal can be a healthy addition to your dog's diet.


DRINKS: NOTHING BUT WATER!

Keep your dog especially away from caffeine, alcohol, cocoa, colas, and energy drinks.

  • Coffee/tea

    Caffeine can be fatal! Watch out for coffee and tea, even the beans and the grounds. Caffeine is also in some cold medicines and pain killers. Think your dog had caffeine? Get your dog to the vet as soon as possible.

  • Alcohol

    Even a little amount of alcohol can cause severe liver and brain damage in dogs. Just a little beer, liquor, wine, or food with alcohol can be bad. It can cause vomiting, diarrhea, coordination problems, breathing problems, coma, even death. And the smaller your dog, the worse it can be.

  • Gatorade

    Just like coffee and tea, energy drinks contain caffeine. The strong stimulant will cause hyperventilation, respiratory problems, heart palpitations, and muscle tremors in dogs.

  • Juice

    Most store-bought fruit juices contain added sugars, which are not healthy for dogs. Whole juice is safe for dogs in small amounts and only occasionally; but still not necessary for a dog’s diet.


On the PetCareRx website find healthy foods

On the PetCareRx website, find healthy foods, supplements, and diets as well as medications for allergy relief, antimicrobial, behavioral management, and treatment at their pet pharmacy online.

  • experience

    Dogs may experience fleas, worms, or heartworm disease in their lifetime. Pet owners want to ensure the health and comfort of their furry best friends.Intestinal worms can infect our pups within the womb, contaminated soil, flea infestation, and other dogs' fecal matter.

  • Common intestinal

    The five common intestinal worms in domestic dogs are spaghetti-shaped roundworms, tissue-burrowing whipworms, blood-sucking hookworms, nutrient-absorbing tapeworms, and deadly heartworms. If left untreated, the intestinal creepy crawlers can cause damage and health complications

  • Veterinary

    Veterinary-approved chewable Trifexis provides comprehensive parasite protection against intestinal worms, heartworms, and fleas. Understanding prevention, symptoms, and treatment is key to responsible dog ownership.


FACT:

More than 26 dogs get poisoned
every hour in the US!

Yes, we were surprised too

Here is a true story you MUST read!

Hiccup was a beautiful and friendly dog living with his parents Lynnette Beaudin. Hiccup the lab ate a pack of gum with Xylitol, a very common artificial sweetener found in gum, cookies and a lot of other artificially sweetened food items.

Here is what happened to that poor dog:

He looked drunk at first, and then he started collapsing. What followed were painful and severe seizures and then became stiff and was not even able to move. Diagnosed with acute liver damage, there was no option but to put Hiccup down.What’s devastating... Hiccup’s parents didn’t know about Xyli

The Amazing Thing Is:

Dogs like Hiccup don't have to die, if only more people knew...

References:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/be-aware-family-warns-pet-owners-after-dog-eats-gum-containing-xylitol-and-dies-1.5502130

What else to watch out for in “human foods” (not fruits/vegetables):

Be aware of fat trimmings, raw meat, raw eggs, and raw fish! These foods can A) cause choking, vomiting, diarrhea, and pancreatitis, and can B) carry risks of Salmonella or E. coli bacteria that can cause severe food poisoning. Cooked meat without fat or bones is best for dogs.

Avoid any additives, including dairy, sweets, and tomatoes. The added fat from oil or butter while cooking can increase the risk of an adverse reaction.

Be aware of food sensitivities and allergies. Be aware of any wheat or gluten allergies or sensitivities! Dogs can take FDA-approved effective antihistamine Chlorpheniramine allergy relief tablets 2-3 times daily to fight food sensitivities and to guarantee an improved quality of life.

Avoid all candies and sweets, due to high sugar content and toxic xylitol.

Caffeine is toxic as in coffee, tea, and chocolate.

Don’t give any drink outside of water.

Serve human foods in moderation.

Don’t serve any kind of alcohol.

All spicy foods are a No-No.

Choose plain varieties only.

NOTE:As always, contact your veterinarian about your dog’s food sensitivities, specific breeds, age-related issues, and overall health problems.

Trying New Diets

  • Vegetarian Try

  • Vegan

  • Raw food-ism

  • Ketogenic

  • Natural:

    Best diet for dogs. It is entirely acceptable to feed your dog a pure kibble diet. Or you can mix their diet up with some cooked or raw meat, fish, vegetables and rice.

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