How Probable Is It For Your Dog To Recover From Valley Fever? Know the treatment options for your ailing dog.

BY | December 07 | COMMENTS PUBLISHED BY
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Valley fever is a fungal infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides. The symptoms of Valley Fever in dogs are similar to those in humans, with the most common being fever, cough, and respiratory problems.

Valley fever is a fungal infection caused by breathing in airborne spores that are found in soil and dust. It can affect people and animals, including dogs.

The symptoms of valley fever in dogs include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, joint pain, and muscle aches. However, these symptoms are common with other illnesses as well, so it's important to seek veterinary care if you suspect your dog has valley fever. 

What Is Valley Fever?

Valley fever is a fungal infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides. The fungus thrives in dry, desert regions and can be spread through the air by inhaling spores or through contact with infected soil. In most cases, it often affects the lungs but can also affect the skin or other organs.

In some cases, it can be fatal if not treated right away. However, recovery can be seen after being treated with antifungal medications such as Fluconazole or Amphotericin B taken for several weeks or months.

In addition to being able to spread through the air, Valley Fever is also present in certain grasses and soil in certain areas of the United States (including Arizona). This means that if your dog spends a lot of time outside on walks or running around, it could come into contact with one of these contaminated regions and get infected with Valley Fever. 

What Are The Symptoms Of Valley Fever In Dogs?

The symptoms of Valley Fever in dogs are similar to those in humans, with the most common being fever, cough, and respiratory problems. Other common symptoms include joint pain, skin lesions on the feet or abdomen (impetigo), weight loss, or anorexia (loss of appetite). Meloxidyl is a trusted drug for treating musculoskeletal pains. While Theophylline for dogs helps cure cough, it has some side effects that need to be managed.

If your dog has developed any of these symptoms after spending time in a region where Valley Fever is prevalent, then you should take them to see a vet immediately for further evaluation and testing. 

What Is The Treatment For Valley Fever In Dogs?

If your dog is old or has an existing health condition, you may want to consider giving them a probiotic supplement that contains Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum in order to boost the function of their immune system.

  • Antifungal medication such as doxycycline or azithromycin daily for 1–3 months straight while also giving oral medications such as Terbinafine once every week; both drugs work well against VF without causing any side effects in most dogs.

  • Some owners prefer using alternative treatments such as colloidal silver instead because these products seem safer than traditional medications when dealing with parasites like Coccidia. They infect many puppies under 3 months old, especially those born outdoors, where ticks carry VF into homes easily through cracks in walls.

  • Medication for secondary infections such as respiratory infections, pneumonia, or eye infections.

  • Antibiotics such as Zymox for any other illnesses your dog might have (such as skin problems) if they are secondary to Valley Fever, which is often the case. Simplicef for dogs is another pet medication containing the active ingredient Cefpodoxime Proxetil. This helps suppress the growth of bacterial, fungal, and protozoan micro-organisms. 

Is Your Dog At Risk?

The prognosis for a dog that contracts Valley fever is based on several factors.

  • Age of the dog – Older dogs are more likely to have complications, but younger dogs may develop severe cases.

  • Lifestyle of the dog – Outdoor or indoor pets? Is it an active or sedentary animal? How often does it go outside and play with other animals? These things can be important in determining how quickly your pet’s body responds to treatment and if there will be any long-term effects from their illness.

  • How long has your pet had symptoms? Sometimes symptoms will not appear until months after exposure to the fungus. This means that a veterinarian might not suspect Valley fever until they run tests on your pet's blood samples (which can take up to two weeks). In other cases, symptoms develop within six weeks after exposure and can vary greatly depending on the time between infection and when you take action. 

Can Valley Fever Be Passed From A Dog To Humans?

The answer is yes, but it’s rare. If you are working with animals that contract Valley Fever and give them a blood transfusion, there is an increased risk of you contracting the disease. 

Conclusion

Your dog will likely recover from Valley Fever with medication and time. Not all dogs that contract Valley Fever survive, but over 90% do. If your dog gets sick, take it to the vet right away and get a diagnosis.

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