All You Need to Know About Hemorrhoids in Dogs

BY | February 02 | COMMENTS PUBLISHED BY
All You Need to Know About Hemorrhoids in Dogs

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Dogs can also get hemorrhoids. Yes, this painful and gruesome condition can also affect our beloved pets. For humans, hemorrhoids are swollen blood vessels located in the lower anus or rectum. They are usually internal but can also protrude externally. Suffice it to say, they are a literal and very real pain in the behind. Since the anatomy of a dog is different from that of a human, they rarely ever get hemorrhoids. But when they do, immediate medical attention is required. They can happen when the blood vessels that are in your dog’s anus get enlarged. The vessels go on to bulge because of the increased blood flow.

What are the causes of hemorrhoids in dogs?

Dog hemorrhoids usually occur when there is pressure in the rectal area, causing the expansion of the blood vessels. The expanded blood vessels will then have an increased blood flow, then causing the vessels to bulge further, forming hemorrhoids. Vets also believe that a bad diet coupled with poor muscle tone may also have a part to play in the development of hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids could also be a genetic component. 

Let's take a look at some of the most common causes of hemorrhoids in dogs.

1. Age: As dogs get older, their bodies naturally become less flexible and more prone to injury. The same thing happens with their digestive system, which can cause strain on the muscles and ligaments that support the blood vessels in the anus area. When this happens, it can lead to hemorrhoids forming.

2. Genetics: Just like with humans, if your dog has parents or siblings who have had this condition before, then there's a good chance they will too! This is because some breeds are more susceptible to developing hemorrhoids than others (e.g., Basset Hounds).

3. Obesity: Obesity can cause issues with your dog's digestive system, which may lead to hemorrhoids forming over time if left untreated! It's important to keep your dog at a healthy weight so that they don't develop any serious health problems like this one later down the road!

What are the different types of hemorrhoids?

Just like in humans, hemorrhoids in dogs can be both internal as well as external. Internal hemorrhoids can be found below the anus’s lining, inside the rectum. External hemorrhoids can be found outside the rectum, directly under the skin. They cause moderate to severe pain, depending on the location and size. They can also rupture, causing bleeding and more pain. 

Internal hemorrhoids can be difficult to detect without an examination by a veterinarian because there's no outwardly visible sign of their presence. They're usually larger than external hemorrhoids, so if your dog has been diagnosed with one you'll likely notice some discomfort associated with defecation, so your pup may try to avoid going poop altogether!

Symptoms that your dog might have hemorrhoids

The very first sign that your dog might have a hemorrhoid is when he starts itching his rear end. You will start finding blood in his stool. If your dog is suffering from external hemorrhoids, he may even take to dragging that area on the ground to relieve the irritation and discomfort. 

In the case of external hemorrhoids, you’ll be able to catch them quicker because they protrude externally, making them easier to detect and diagnose. Hemorrhoids in dogs can be difficult to distinguish. They often get mistaken for fissures and tumors. It’s safe to get your vet to do a thorough examination before jumping to the conclusion that your dog has hemorrhoids.

Here are some symptoms that your dog might have hemorrhoids:

  • Licking and biting at his bottom

  • Scooting his bottom on the floor or carpet

  • Red or purple patches on his bottom

  • A swollen anus (looks like a donut)

  • Blood in the stool

How should you treat your dog’s hemorrhoids?

The treatment for dog hemorrhoids is pretty straightforward. So straightforward that you can even do it at home. Apply chilled witch hazel with a cotton ball three times a day, to the infected area. To keep the witch hazel chilled, store it in the fridge after each use. There should also be a change in your dog’s diet. 

Ask your vet about the right foods, and he will help you come up with a diet chart that works for everyone. Adding fiber is key. Try limiting or eliminating dairy products altogether. Get him to drink more water. Remember that it only hurts while it lasts. 

A hemorrhoid is a curable condition. Here are some tips on what to do:

  1. Check with your vet to make sure it's actually hemorrhoids and not something else. This can be done through a simple blood test.

  2. If they are, in fact, hemorrhoids, ask your vet how long they're likely to last. Hemorrhoids can last anywhere from a few days to several weeks, depending on the severity of the condition and the type of dog involved.

  3. If your dog seems uncomfortable or has trouble sitting down, try elevating its rear end by placing a pillow or rolled-up towel under its butt when it sits or lays down for long periods of time—this can make the discomfort less severe or even eliminate it altogether!

  4. You may also want to consider giving your dog an anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen or aspirin every day until their hemorrhoids go away (make sure you check with your vet first).

 

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I treat my dog's hemorrhoids at home?

It is not recommended to treat your dog's hemorrhoids at home. Hemorrhoids in dogs can be caused by a variety of factors, including constipation, diarrhea, and anal gland problems. If your dog is experiencing hemorrhoids, it is important to have them evaluated by a veterinarian to determine the underlying cause and to receive proper treatment. In some cases, hemorrhoids in dogs may resolve on their own with proper management of the underlying cause. However, more severe cases may require medical intervention, such as medication or surgery. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend the most appropriate course of treatment based on the specifics of your dog's condition. In the meantime, you can help your dog feel more comfortable by keeping the area clean and dry and by avoiding activities that may exacerbate the problem, such as strenuous exercise or rough play. It is also important to feed your dog a high-quality diet and to ensure that they have access to plenty of water to prevent constipation.

Can you use hemorrhoid cream on a dog?

It is not recommended to use hemorrhoid cream on a dog. Hemorrhoid cream is formulated for use in humans and may not be safe or effective for use in dogs. Additionally, the active ingredients in hemorrhoid cream may be toxic to dogs if ingested. If your dog is experiencing hemorrhoids, it is important to have them evaluated by a veterinarian to determine the underlying cause and to receive proper treatment. In some cases, hemorrhoids in dogs may resolve on their own with proper management of the underlying cause. However, more severe cases may require medical intervention, such as medication or surgery. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend the most appropriate course of treatment based on the specifics of your dog's condition.

What do hemorrhoids in dogs look like?

Hemorrhoids in dogs can appear as swollen, inflamed veins in the rectal area. They may be visible as lumps or bumps around the anus or inside the rectum. Hemorrhoids in dogs may be painful and can cause discomfort or difficulty when defecating. Hemorrhoids in dogs can be caused by a variety of factors, including constipation, diarrhea, and anal gland problems. You can help your dog feel more comfortable by avoiding activities that may exacerbate the problem, such as strenuous exercise or rough play. It is also important to feed your dog a high-quality diet and to ensure that they have access to plenty of water to prevent constipation.

How do you treat a dog with hemorrhoids?

If you are seeking ways to relieve the discomfort associated with hemorrhoids in your dog, there are a few things you can try at home. However, it is important to note that these remedies are meant to provide temporary relief and are not a substitute for veterinary care. Here are a few options you can try. Apply a warm compress to the affected area. It can help reduce inflammation and discomfort. Administer over-the-counter pain medication, but check with your veterinarian to determine the appropriate dosage and frequency for your dog. Provide a soft and comfortable place for your dog to rest to reduce pressure on the affected area and promote healing. And most importantly, avoid activities that may exacerbate the condition, including excessive exercise or jumping. It is important to consult with a veterinarian if your dog is experiencing hemorrhoids, as they may be a sign of a serious underlying condition that requires medical attention. Your veterinarian will be able to determine the best course of treatment for your dog and may recommend medications, dietary changes, and/or surgery.

What causes a dog to get hemorrhoids?

There are several potential causes of hemorrhoids in dogs. If a dog is constipated, it may strain excessively during bowel movements, which can cause the veins in the rectal area to become enlarged and swollen. If a dog's anal glands are not functioning properly, they may strain excessively during bowel movements, which can lead to the development of hemorrhoids. Overweight dogs may be more prone to developing hemorrhoids due to the added pressure on the rectal area. Chronic diarrhea can lead to irritation and inflammation of the rectal area, which can cause the veins to become enlarged and swollen. As dogs age, their muscles and tissues may weaken, which can make them more prone to developing hemorrhoids. Some dogs may also have a genetic predisposition to developing hemorrhoids.

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