5 Signs That Your Cat is Suffering From Arthritis

BY | December 23 | COMMENTS PUBLISHED BY
5 Signs That Your Cat is Suffering From Arthritis

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Arthritis & Pain
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Arthritis is a fairly uncommon condition in cats. It affects about three in every ten cats. Arthritis may affect cats as they age due to disintegration of the joints. However, there have been cases where it has occurred in younger cats due to infection or trauma. It is important that you are aware of signs associated with arthritis so you can spot the same in case your cat develops the condition. While arthritis is a long-standing condition which does not have any cure once it has set in, given the right treatment,

medications

and a few lifestyle changes, you can contain the pain and discomfort that it is causing to your pet. Here are some signs of arthritis that you want to watch out for:

Finds it difficult to climb up the stairs

If you cat faces difficulties in climbing up the stairs or stops jumping onto perches and countertops all of a sudden, then it could be a sign of arthritis. Your cat may be hesitant about moving as freely as before due to the pain and discomfort.

Is not keen on playing

Cats with arthritis tend to tire much faster than when they were healthy. Your cat may show signs of lethargy, where it is not as keen on playing as it was before. You may find them sleeping for much longer than usual, and they may also show difficulty in finding a comfortable position to sleep in.

Limps when it walks

Does your cat limp when it walks? You will have too observe closely for this sign, as the limp may be conspicuous right after your cat gets up to move around, rather than a while after, when it is already warmed up.

Shows reduced grooming

Does the coat of hair on your cat appear unkept? Cats with arthritis have a tendency to not groom themselves, resulting in a disheveled appearance, but this is not always the case. Some other cats have a tendency to lick, bite and chew in areas that are causing pain. They may lick, bite or chew on the area till it shows up as some swollen skin or a bald patch.

Is easily irritable

Does your cat have a case of โ€œbad moodsโ€ off late? It could be due to arthritis pain. Cats are wired to not show any signs of weakness or pain, so they can guard themselves in case they are attacked. So, what you are assuming to be as just foul mood could actually be as a result of painful joints. Cats may show their irritability by snapping or biting when you approach them or try to hold them, or if it causes more pain when you handle them.

A Comprehensive Guide to Managing Cat Arthritis

Arthritis happens. Cats get older, just like all of us, and when they do, the moving parts start to show signs of fatigue. However, since the life expectancy of a cat is substantially shorter than that of a human, the onset of their arthritis might seem a bit more abrupt -- one day they are leaping off counter tops, and the next they can barely get off the sofa. When it does happen, it is good to know what you are in for, and what you can do to help.

Thankfully, we here at PetCareRx have been compiling oodles of information on the subject. Here's everything you need to know to better understand your catโ€™s condition.

arthritis in cats 101

As cats age, their ability to repair the cartilage in their joints diminishes, resulting in osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis in pets. When this happens, it can help to know the symptoms (difficulty walking, atrophy in a single leg, etc), and what you can do to help ease their pain (light exercise, certain NSAID type drugs, corticosteroids).

Containing pretty much everything you need to know, from causes to treatments, this handy article is a great reference sheet for edifying yourself on the ins and outs of your pet's condition.

Hip Dysplasia in Cats

A preexisting condition likely to increase your catโ€™s odds of developing arthritis, hip dysplasia is often not diagnosed until the damage has been done. While it may be a primarily inherited trait, it can be exacerbated by being overweight, and there is no cure, so it is a good idea to be on the lookout for this syndrome.

This series of articles has everything you need to know about hip dysplasia, helping to prepare you against all its potential ravages, from causes and symptoms to treatment and tips.

nutrition for arthritic cats

Part of managing your catโ€™s arthritis, like many other ailments, comes down to diet. Helping your kitty shed some pounds, along with giving some supplements to help support the cartilage surrounding their joints, are key to helping improve your catโ€™s condition.

This article gives a detailed overview of steps you can be taking to help offset the otherwise rapid deterioration of your catโ€™s mobility.

joint health products for pets with arthritis

Need help figuring out what kind of supplements your arthritic cat should be taking? Confused by all the different options for vitamins and food that are out there?

Depending on your catโ€™s specific condition, some types of treatment might be more effective than others, which is why we compiled this buying guide to help you sift through the sea of available products.

chondroitin and glucosamine for dogs and cats

Chondroitin and glucosamine are two popular supplements used to help cope with arthritis -- chondroitin helping to keep cartilage from deteriorating further, and glucosamine helping to keep the joints moving smoothly.

This article explains the mechanisms behind these treatments, how to use them, and why it pays to take them together.

And that's it, for now. Keep checking back, though, as any new article that comes out on the subject of cat arthritis is going to be included in this roundup, and there are sure to be a bunch more on the horizon.

More on Cat Care

When to Take a Cat to the Vet
Antibiotics for Cats
All About Cat Hairballs

This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant as a substitute for the professional advice of, or diagnosis or treatment by, your veterinarian with respect to your pet. It has, however, been verified by a licensed veterinarian for accuracy.

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