Is Your Kitten Really Hyperactive?

By August 16 | See Comments

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With button noses, itty-bitty teeth and silky feelers, it is impossible not to fall in love with a kitten. However, as a lot of pet owners can personally attest, their adorable little fluff balls can wreak a lot of havoc by sprinting around in your house, tackling their feet under your favorite covers and climbing up your fine threaded curtains on a regular basis. Let us look deeper into why kittens behave the way they do and how to calm them down when they are revved up.The energy level of your kitten depends on his age. At around eight weeks, your kitten will start to get active but will not be coordinated enough to scale up the curtains in the house. As they grow older, their energy and coordination will increase and you will start to see them leaping, chasing and jumping on things. They will even playfully attack you from time to time.As a pet owner, you need to understand that cats are obligate carnivores and they use their predatory instincts to hunt by exploring their surroundings. You need to harness their instincts into something more productive by providing your kitten with plenty of regular and consistent playtime.

How to go about it?

Though it might look like it is impossible to entertain your cat without amassing battle wounds in the form of bites, scratches and ruined upholstery, there are plenty of options to channel your kitten’s energy to calm him down. If you want to adopt a kitten, or have a feisty one already, consider the following tips:

  • Do not use your body – If you are going to play with your kitten, you need to do it in a way that does not encourage them to use your body as a toy. Encourage your kitten to nibble on cat toys instead of fingers and hands, as that can lead to inappropriate behavior as they grow older.
  • Mimic hunting – Tap into the natural instincts of your kitten by replicating the hunt cycle that your cat is hardwired to perform. Use a toy that they can chase instead of actual prey, especially one that mimics a bird or a bug.
  • Redirect your kitten’s energy – If you are tired but your kitten isn’t, give them a bouncy ball so that they can redirect their energy and tire themselves out. Do not touch or restrain your kitten as it will arouse them even more.
  • Cool down – Think about your cat’s playtime the same way as you would your own exercise regime and incorporate some time for them to warm up to it and cool down after. As you wind down the play, slow your movements and allow your cat to chase after his toy in a more leisurely fashion to signal to him that it is time to relax. If you stop the pla without cooling down, there is a good chance that your kitten will go after you as you are the only moving object in front of him.
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