2 Dogs Thrown From Car Saved By Shelter

By December 22 | See Comments

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2 Dogs Thrown From Car Saved By Shelter

Can you imagine if you saw two little puppies get thrown from a car and abandoned in a parking lot?Joey Eugene can, and for the two beagle-spaniel mixes that this happened to in the Bronx, New York, they are lucky he did. Without a second thought, Joey 

went over to help them

and brought them to a no-kill shelter, the New York Daily News reported.

'Someone was there who knew what to do'

Eugene was walking his Bulldog, Zeppole, when he saw the vile act. Stunned, Joey collected himself - and the puppies - bringing them to 

New Beginnings Animal Rescue

, the only no-kill shelter in the Bronx. He knew its owner and sole employee, Pedro Rosario. Rosario told the newspaper he was shocked that the dogs were tossed and abandoned by their owner, but he's happy they're okay now."I just can't believe how someone would do something like that," Rosario said. "People can be so cruel and there's no reason for it. It's a miracle someone was there who knew what to do."The dogs were seen by a veterinarian when they were found and in good physical health. Now, the male beagle-spaniel is 1 year old and named Jay, while the female is 2 and called Bey. Both are currently ready for adoption, as are about 30 other dogs and 60 cats at the shelter.

What you need to know for a shelter visit

When many dog lovers hear a heartbreaking story like Jay and Bey's, they go out to shelters to volunteer, donate, or even adopt. But, if you're considering adopting a dog, you should know what you're doing when you visit the shelter. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals advised following a few guidelines.

  • Talk to the staff - While you may want to hurry up and take your new furry friend home, the staff can be a powerful resource. With information on the dog's behavior as well as which pills for dogs for fleas and ticks will be best, the volunteers or employees at the shelter can be invaluable help before and after you decide to adopt.
  • Don't misunderstand a dog's body language - Just because a dog is shy when you meet them in the shelter doesn't mean they always will be. Dogs can be timid or bark for a variety of reasons - it doesn't mean they don't like you. Often the loud or chaotic shelter environment can make dogs act skittish or scared. However, aggressive canine tendencies like growling or freezing when you approach, may want to be avoided, especially with young children at home.
  • Spend plenty of time at the shelter - Getting a dog can be a big decision, so the ASPCA recommended that people spend a significant amount of time at the shelter with their prospective dogs. Try a little quiet time with your potential pooch then take them on a walk around the grounds or ask about a space to play a bit to see if you two are really compatible.
  • Check if he's "kid ready" - Whether you have children at home or just nieces or nephews who visit, going to the shelter is a good time to see if your new dog will be kid friendly. The ASPCA explained that you can check this by annoying your pooch. Try poking or prodding them the way that a child might. Their reaction will tell you a lot and save you from a dangerous situation later on.

If you do end up adopting a dog in need like Jay or Bey, use

PetPlus

for all your pet needs from preventative medications to healthy dog foods.

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