Keeping Your Dog Safe During a Flood

BY | May 29 | COMMENTS PUBLISHED BY

Image Credits: Pixabay

Flood is, unfortunately, a common occurrence in most parts of the world. It can come swiftly and without warning, the most typical example being flash floods. The waters not only cause structural damage but can also threaten the life of your puppy. It is essential that you are aware of what to do during the time of rising waters.

First actions

The first action to do when you hear of a coming flood is to bring the dog inside and climb to the top floor of your residence. Bring all dog training equipment or toys which may get swept away or get damaged by the flood. Do not forget to put all the important documents related to your dogs, like vaccination records, the dog's microchip number, and the contact information of your vet in a sealed, waterproof pouch or bag. If the authorities ask you to evacuate, do so and take your dog. Emergency services are instructed to accept pets at the time of rescue. There is thus no compulsion to leave the dog behind.

Decide your destination

Ensure that your dog has the physical capability to walk or run or even swim to a safer place. It must be able to climb upstairs and travel in a car if you want to evacuate speedily. In case you have a senior dog and live in a flood-prone area, do consider purchasing dog stairs or buying a ramp. It is also essential to know the flood risk. Check with your local government office on the flood risks of your home area. You should even understand the different kind of flood alerts issued by the government. If you know, it is possible to take appropriate response. Keep an emergency bag near you at all times. This bag should contain a few essentials for both of you when you two are far from home. The kit should contain bowls, dog identification, including registration numbers, and extra leashes. Do carry a photo of the dog and ownership proof. Include a comprehensive list of the canine's vaccinations, prescriptions, and medications.

Finalize the location where you and your dog can go in case of a sudden evacuation. This could range from a friend's home to a pet-friendly hotel or motel located outside the flood area boundaries. It makes excellent sense to have multiple options. This is important if a few roads get blocked and you are compelled to change direction. Veterans of flood catastrophe stress the importance of neighborhood buddy systems. If a flash flood hits when you are not at home, make arrangements with your neighbor to evacuate the dog. Do not forget to show the neighbor the location of your dog's emergency bag. Do keep your neighbor's phone number with you at all times.

Help Pets Affected by Colorado Flooding

colorado-flooding-help-pets

Disastrous flooding in Colorado along a 150-mile stretch of the state's Front Range, both north and south of Denver, has caused 3 human deaths and thousands of evacuations.As always, pets are just affected by disasters as their people. Here's how you can help.

Humane Society of Boulder is accepting small animals

Get help:

 Head to the Humane Society at 

2323 55th Street

, or contact 303-441-3333 even after they close for emergency dispatch.

Help out:

They're accepting

donations online

to offset their costs.

Longmont Humane Society is accepting small animals

Get help:

As Longmont areas are flooded, only attempt to get to the shelter if you have safe access. They're at

9595 Nelson Road

, and suggest that "for animal evacuation assistance or for more information please call Longmont Animal Control at 303-651-8500."

Help out: Donate

to help care for the animals in needs.

Douglas County Fairgrounds at Castle Rock is accepting large animals

Get help:

Residents with large animals should take them to 

Douglas County Fairgrounds

,

500 Fairgrounds Road

.

Need more info?

Follow flood news by location with

The Denver Post

.Have info to share? Send it to ksherbo (at) petcarerx (dot) com.

Need to evacuate?

Double check against our

pet disaster preparedness list and read fema's recommendations for what to do if you simply must leave your pet. href>pet disaster preparedness list and read fema's recommendations for what to do if you simply must leave your pet.>

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