Dog Traveling to Tampa Lost by Delta Airlines

By November 13 | See Comments

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Dog Traveling to Tampa Lost by Delta Airlines

Frank Romano lost a lot more than his luggage when he flew across the country recently. Romano is blaming Delta Airlines for losing his 6-year-old pit bull, Ty, at Los Angeles International Airport, CBS Los Angeles reported.Initially, a Delta representative told Romano that his dog chewed through his kennel and died, which happens to about a dozen pets each year, according to CBS. But then she said the dog was lost.The recently adopted pit bull was flying with Romano and his family as part of their move to Tampa, Florida. Ty's whereabouts are still unknown, but Delta explained that they expect the dog escaped from the kennel himself."It's been very depressing. Very upsetting. I've been crying. I've been angry," Romano told CBS. "... I just want my dog back. He's my best friend, that dog."

How to travel with your pooch

It can be scary to read about a missing dog like Ty because Romano didn't do anything wrong to cause his pet to leave. Although some dangers are unavoidable, the best way to protect your dog during travel is to follow proper protocols.

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Flying

The first thing you should do when you're planning on flying with your dog is to call the airline. Ask about how they transport dogs, what paperwork you should bring, what crate type is optimal and if you can give your furry friend any other belongings, Cesar's Way explained.Bring your dog into the airport already in a crate to avoid any additional chaos before boarding. Cesar's Way also recommended that dogs have empty bladders and stomachs, which means no food and minimal water for six hours before the trip. Make sure he's hydrated but not full of water.

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Driving

If your dog is traveling in your car in a crate, he should have plenty of room to move around, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals explained. The animal advocacy group also suggested practicing with short journeys first before tackling a serious road trip.Bring all your dog's paperwork or photocopies just in case. Also, ensure you have plenty of food, water, medicine and other supplies for the whole ride. Just like you, if you feed your dog, give him a chance to use the bathroom. The ASPCA advises against letting your dog stick his head out the window or leaving him in an unattended parked car.A

PetPlus

membership gives you the chance to stock up on the food, toys and medication your dog needs before a big ride without spending your vacation budget.

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