Does Your Dog Chase Cars?

By April 05 | See Comments

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Does Your Dog Chase Cars?
Image courtesy: Pixabay.com/

Chasing is a natural behavior in dogs, and they are happy chasing, regardless of whether it is chasing a car or a rabbit. However, chasing cars is not one of those harmless behaviors that you can ignore. Your pet may get killed while he is out in the street chasing cars. Let’s take a look at how you can curb this habit in your pet.

Commands

Teach your dog the “come” command, so he returns to you every time you sound the command. Similar to other training commands, you want to maintain a calm and assertive tone to establish yourself as the leader to your dog. You may not see the results right away, but do not make the mistake of chasing your pet if he fails to disobey or runs away with an object. You want to lay down the rules so he returns when asked to. You can then use praise or

treats

to reinforce the behavior.You can also try teaching your pet the “Stop” command. Put your pet on a leash and hold out a tennis ball in one hand. Then roll the tennis ball on the ground. When he instinctively tries to chase after it tug the leash and say “Stop.” You do not want him to mistake it to be a game of chase, which is exactly why you want to tug the leash when he tries to go after the ball. Once he gets a hang of the command you can treat him. The next step is to try the same trick with cars. Of course, you do not want to try training your pet with any random vehicle on the street. You want to ask a friend to help you train your pet, and preferably in a street that is away from all the traffic. Make sure your dog is on leash while training, so he does not run free into the street. Say “Stop” sharply every time he tugs at the

leash

. You can try practicing without a leash once he starts obeying promptly to the command.

Professional assistance

If your dog’s chasing behavior does not stop or reduce even after you try out any of the above methods, then seeking professional assistance for training your pet may be your last resort. Some pet owners recommend the use of force or shock collars to put a stop to their dog’s chasing behavior, but we suggest that you try a different means. If your dog’s fixation toward chasing cars is intense, then minor distraction techniques or commands will not do the trick. You will need the assistance of a professional trainer who takes both the physical and psychological factors into account to correct the behavior in your pet.

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