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Oral Flea Control: Flea Pills for Dogs and Cats

What is Oral Flea Prevention for Cats and Dogs?

By Roderick McClain. January 01, 2011 | See Comments

Oral Flea Control: Flea Pills for Dogs and Cats

Oral flea control, like Capstar Flea Killer, Comfortis, and Program Flea Killer for Cats, protect your pet's entire body from fleas and ticks.

What is oral flea control?

Oral flea control refers to flea pills for dogs and cats you give to them to prevent fleas from harming them. While some topical flea and tick treatments, such as frontline for cats and dogs, could leave areas of your pet unprotected from harmful flea infestation, oral medications provide protection for your pet’s entire body. Some oral treatments begin working within thirty minutes, rendering all fleas dead within four hours. Because a female flea can produce as many as fifty eggs a day and five hundred eggs over a lifetime, it's critical to defend your furry friends against the aggressive reproduction of this harmful parasite.

Why use oral flea treatments?

How do I know my pet needs flea treatment?

Signs of flea activity can be found in the fur of your pet. You may see flea dirt, which looks like small particles of soil, but is actually waste generated by a meal of your pet's blood.

If your pet seems anxious, or stops playing to scratch and bite, fleas may be the cause. If when examining the skin of your pet you find flea dirt or see live fleas, unfortunately the situation won't improve without your action.

Many veterinarians recommend the use of oral flea medication in response to a sudden flea infestation. Oral treatments can provide visible results in less than an hour.

Fleas can transfer from pet to owner within ten minutes, causing itching and soreness. Hard, compact bodies make these dreadful parasites difficult to crush. If you find a live flea, the best way to dispatch the parasite is by drowning them in soapy water.

What are the differences between oral flea treatments?

Comfortis, which is available with a pet prescription from your veterinarian, comes in a chewable tablet and starts working in half an hour. If you have pesticide-sensitive pets or you just want to avoid topical treatments, this option may be for you. The best part is that you and your little buddy can battle fleas without a break in playtime.

  • The typical dosage is 13.5 mg per pound
  • Your pet should have a full stomach for maximum effect
  • One tablet prevents infestations for up to one month

Capstar is clean and easy. It comes in pill form, so you can feed it directly to your pet or mix it into food. This treatment is safe for pregnant pets and breeding animals, and safe for kittens more than four weeks old and over two pounds. Pet owners who choose this treatment report that they can see dead fleas falling off of their animals. Make note that this product is an immediate treatment for existing adult fleas, and not a preventative.

  • Lasts up to 24 hours
  • Safe for younger animals
  • Kills all fleas within 4 hours

If your pet suffers from fleas, just getting rid of the current generation is not enough. Program Flea Killer for Cats is a preventative medication that interrupts the life cycle of fleas at every stage of growth, halting progress and ensuring death. Administer this medication as soon as flea season begins where you live to stop flea infestations before they begin. The dosage of this treatment is dependent upon your pet's weight, and is administered just once a month.

  • Available in flavored tablets or in a liquid suspension
  • Administer on a full stomach
  • Comes in a six-month supply

Which flea orals are right for my pet?

  • Comfortis works instantly for pets 14 weeks and older and requires a prescription
  • Program Flea Killer is available in a six month supply
  • Capstar is safe for daily use with ongoing flea infestations

There are many different oral flea treatment options for pet owners. It's important to remember that medication engineered for dogs could be harmful to cats, and vice versa. The dosage levels in these products are important, so know the weigh of your pet and consult your veterinarian before administering.

If an infestation is left untreated, pets could experience a lack of red blood cells, or anemia. Animals may also contract tapeworms if they digest fleas carrying tapeworm larvae. Oral flea medication destroys fleas in every stage of life, leaving you and your pet free to enjoy one another's company without the pain and stress of crawling, biting pests.

What about pills for ticks?

Currently there are no pills or oral medications available to prevent or treat against ticks. The Preventic collar is, however, a nice add-on to a flea pill regimen for complete flea AND tick protection.

Products mentioned

Capstar Flea Killer
Comfortis
Program Flea Killer for Cats
Preventic Dog Collar

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This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant as a substitute for the professional advice of, or diagnosis or treatment by, your veterinarian. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian or other qualified professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard or delay seeking professional advice due to what you may have read on our website.

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