To bark or not to bark, that is the question

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To bark or not to bark, that is the question
Get your dog trained for the big show
Get your dog trained for the big show

No longer will Shakespeare - or Mel Gibson - be the only ones associated with "Hamlet." A new project, organized by Kevin Broccoli, has been successfully funded on Kickstarter to coordinate a production of the classic play using only Pugs as cast members.Mashable explained that Broccoli plans to have the dogs onstage for the entire show while actors read characters' lines offstage. Although he hopes to court the likes of James Earl Jones, who famously played Claudius in numerous live performances, big names have yet to be formally announced. Broccoli hopes to host the event at a large venue such as the Dunkin' Donuts Center in Providence, Rhode Island - his base of operations - but he really wants to bring the show to New York City.An actor, writer and Pug owner, Broccoli wanted to combine all of his passions into one major event."To be honest, pugs always remind me of Hamlet," Broccoli said, quoted by Mashable. "Always kind of sad and brooding even though they bring so much joy to others."Titled "Pug-let," the event is looking to attract very talented Pugs to join its cast. Similar to dog shows, the play requires pets who have been expertly trained in skills like stand-and-stay and responding to non-verbal commands. While Broccoli plans to donate all of the play's proceeds to various dog charities, owners can take pride knowing that their Pugs might be renowned for their acting chops and obedience.Even though Tony awards may not be in their future, canines can greatly benefit from extensive training. They all don't need to win major events, but it can certainly provide peace of mind to owners knowing that their furry friends understand who's in charge in the household. The

best dog products

can go a long way in getting started.

Get your dog trained for the big show

Basic training is needed to ensure that family canines are housebroken and don't make messes around the home. Yet some pet parents opt to go above and beyond the standard training protocols to get their dogs prepared for various shows and events.Raising a show dog can be especially difficult and training has to start very early on. According to the Dog Channel, owners should begin basic exercises with their puppies within weeks of bringing them home. Done consistently, training can be retained very quickly and give the dog a headstart over the competition.When beginning with the basics, owners will benefit from using positive reinforcement methods. This kind of system involves awarding dog treats or toys for demonstrating the desired behavior. For example, one of the most useful skills for canines to learn is looking at their owners on command. By using food as bait, pet parents can instruct their furry friends to respond to their names in a short span of time. Young dogs learn best through rewards and repetition, and during these early stages it's important to not let puppies develop any bad habits that are difficult to correct down the road.An important skill for show dogs to learn is standing for examination. During the events, judges need to walk around and get closer looks at each contestant, requiring canines to sit still for long periods of time. Training the canine to stand at attention calls for an incredible amount of patience from owners and dogs alike. However, the use of a clicker can make the exercises far easier and help command the pooch to stay in place while being touched. You can find this kind of an item on an

online pet store

.While dog shows are common reasons for extensive training, coaching Pugs to participate in something far more lavish and theatrical is a perfect example of the capabilities of a well-trained canine. Pet parents should sign up for

PetPlus

to receive access to all of the best online deals on

pet medications

, toys and other essential items.

SourcesDog ChannelMashableKickstarter
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