The Average Lifespan of a Cat Breed by Breed Chart From Siamese to Domestic Cat Breeds

BY | March 04 | COMMENTS PUBLISHED BY
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Cats come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. As such, different cat breeds have different life expectancies. The average lifespan of a cat depends on a lot of variables -- from diet and exercise to their overall health to their breed. To get a better idea of your catโ€™s expected lifespan, check out this list of cat breeds and average ages.

Just like dogs, cats come in a number of different breeds, each with their own unique set of characteristics. Some cat breeds are big, some are fluffy, some are short, some are bald -- cats run the gamut. And, just like dogs, different cat breeds have different life expectancies. While a number of cat breeds are expected to live to be around 12 years of age, others routinely make it into their 20s. Thatโ€™s a pretty big gap!

Your cat's lifespan is more likely to be affected by their diet, lifestyle, and whether or not they are on flea, tick or heartworm meds like Heartgard, Revolution for cats, or Advantage Multi for cats. That said, their breedโ€™s average lifespan can be a handy piece of information to have. Here are the average lifespans of some of the most popular cat breeds.

Breed

Average Lifespan (Years)

Abyssinian

9-15

American Bobtail

13-15

American Curl

15+

American Shorthair

15-20

American Wirehair

7-12

Australian Mist

14-19

Balinese

18-22

Bengal

12-16

Birman

12-16

Blue Chartreux

12-15

Bombay

15-20

British Shorthair

12+

Burmese

16-18

Burmilla

10-15

California Spangled

9-16

Ceylon

~15

Chantilly-Tiffany

14-16

Colorpoint Shorthair

12-16

Cornish Rex

11-15

Cymric

8-14

Devon Rex

9-15

Domestic

12-14

Egyptian Mau

13-16

European Shorthair

15-22

Exotic Shorthair

12-14

German Rex

9-14

Havana Brown

12-15

Himalayan

15+

Japanese Bobtail

15-18

Javanese

10-15

Korat

15+

LaPerm

10-15

Maine Coon

12-15

Manx

8-14

Munchkin

12-14

Nebelung

15-18

Norwegian Forest

14-16

Ocicat

10-15

Oriental

10-15

Persian

15+

Pixiebob

~12

Ragdoll

12-17

Russian Blue

15-20

Scottish Fold

~15

Selkirk Rex

10-15

Siamese

15-20

Siberian

11-15

Singapura

9-15

Snowshoe

12-15

Sokoke

9-15

Somali

10-12

Sphynx

13-15

Tonkinese

10-16

Turkish Angora

12-18

Turkish Van

12-17

What Can Affect A Cat's Lifespan?

Cats make excellent family pets, and owning one can bring a great deal of joy to your heart and your home. However, with that ownership comes responsibility and commitment, especially considering how long a cat can live. To learn about the average cat lifespans of both indoor and outdoor cats, the breeds that live the longest, and what you can do to ensure a long and healthy life for your feline friend, read on.

Average Indoor Cat Lifespan

According to the ASPCA, the average lifespan of an indoor cat is 13 to 17 years, and cats who live up to 20 are not uncommon. One famous tabby cat named Lucy even lived to be 39 years old! A number of factors can determine the lifespan of your indoor cat, such as breed, diet, lifestyle, and veterinary care.

Average Outdoor Cat Lifespan

In general, cats who are let outside to roam during the day have shorter lives than indoor cats. This is because they are susceptible to a number of dangers that do not affect indoor cats, including certain diseases, traffic accidents, and attacks from other animals. The outdoor cat's lifespan can be 2 to 3 years shorter than their indoor counterpart.

Cat Breeds with the Longest Lifespans

One of the primary factors that will determine your catโ€™s lifespan is their breed. In general, mixed breed cats like American Domestics live longer than purebreds, since their genetic diversity protects them from certain hereditary diseases. However, among the purebreds, the Manx and the Siamese are widely known for their longevity. Despite this fact, some of the oldest cats on record arenโ€™t of either breed. Creme Puff, who previously held the record for oldest cat at 38 years old, was most likely a mixed breed. Also, a Burmese named Kataleena Lady lived to be 35 years old, and Grandpa, a Sphynx, lived to be 34.

A Long Life For Your Cat

The best way to ensure a long life for your cat is to keep them healthy and away from danger. The outside world can be a hazardous place for a cat, full of threats like feral disease, traffic accidents, and attacks from other animals. Keep your cat safe by keeping them indoors.

Diet and exercise can also affect your catโ€™s lifespan, so make sure that you are feeding your cat the appropriate amount of healthy food and providing regular exercise. Exercise can take place in the form of playtime, and some cats can even be trained to walk on a leash. Proper diet and exercise are important to stave off obesity, which can lead to diabetesheart diseaseliver diseasearthritis, and breathing issues.

And of course, your catโ€™s life can be better and longer with regular trips to the veterinarian to prevent and catch any health problems.

More on Cat Health

The Importance of Taking Your Cat to the Vet
How To Prevent Dental Health Problems in Cats
Maintaining a Healthy Cat Weight
5 Common Cat Problems and Health Issues

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