How to Train Your Dog to Respect Kids?

By July 01 | See Comments

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How to Train Your Dog to Respect Kids?

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There is nothing more delightful than being a witness to the bond of friendship blossom between a dog and a child. Dogs get along with kids really well and vice versa.

If you’re lucky, those are the types of dogs or kids you will know

. However, it is best not to leave it up to luck. You can take proactive measures to ensure that your canine companion gets along with the kids in your household.

Defining child/dog relationships

There are three main factors to consider in a child/dog relationship – the opportunities they get to interact with each other, the behavior of the child and the behavior of the dog. As a pet owner and a parent, you have the chance to influence all these factors by managing the environment in which the child and the dog interact by training your dog and teaching your kid at the same time.

Training games

Training games are the perfect way to encourage cooperation between kids and dogs. As a pet owner, you should make sure that you teach the game to your dog before you get your kid involved. Adult supervision is crucial during play sessions as excitement can lead to over-excitement in both children and dogs.

  • Hide and seek – This is the perfect activity for both four and two footed family members. One child can distract the dog while the other can call for him. When the hider is caught, he gives the dog a treat/click. Once your dog gets a handle on the game, you can make it more challenging by sending the hider to the other room and encouraging your dog to go find him. The game provides the perfect mental and physical stimulation for both you and your dog.
  • Fetch – The main goal of the game is to make your dog get back the fetched object and wait for the next throw. Make sure you have a treat to offer in exchange for the object and a click to signal the dog as soon as he lets go of the object. If he tries to engage you in a game of tug, or refuses to relinquish the hold of the object, the kid must end the game and not pay attention to the dog for a while. You need to remember that any game that pits the speed or strength of a dog against that of a child could lead to a biting accident. Proper training and adult supervision are essential.
  • Tug and sharing games – Dogs must be taught how to share, and kids must also learn how to respect dogs. If you decide to play a controlled game with two identical items, you can accomplish this goal. The game must be established with a dog and by an adult to start with. Once your dog has learned the rules, you can get the children involved. Make sure you the child is over the age of 9 and can understand the rules well.
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