Correct age to neuter your kitten

By February 26 | See Comments

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It is observed that neutering your cat at different ages results in different character traits. A few cat shelters kittens as young as eight weeks old to make them adoptable. The normal age to neuter any cat is anywhere from six months to eight months old. There is a good reason for neutering at this age. Kittens have a certain age within which they must learn to socialize. They will grow up fearful of the world if they cannot do so. It is advisable that your kitten should be neutered only after the socialization phase. This is applicable for both sexes of cats.

Early neutering

A number of studies have found that cats who were neutered early were much better behaved than felines who were neutered later in their life. The studies in this aspect also discovered that early neutered kittens were more fearful of the outside environment compared to those cats who were neutered later in their life. To give an example, an early neutered kitten would be more likely to pee on the carpet compared to later neutered ones. The rate of learning of new things or procedures, however, remain unaffected.

If you are a new owner of an adorable kitten, it is advisable to teach your kitty house-training in a gentle manner. To potty train your cat, for example, put the feline in the litter box after it finishes eating. Scratch the litter to give it an idea of what you want. Limit them to one room in the house until the cat understands what you are trying to convey. It is found that kittens who get more love and attention from their owners are more confident than those who grew up in a single cat household. A kitten who is friendly towards you when you two first meet will be more sociable and better behaved compared to those who exhibit aggression.

Aggressive owner means aggressive cat

Frequent scolding of the cat and showing bad behavior not only reduces the confidence of the kitty, but also makes it more aggressive. It will deliberately attack things and throw them if they can. An aggressive owner makes an aggressive cat. It is seen that multi-cat household felines are less aggressive than single ones.

A few findings are puzzling. To give an example, a cat which sees its owners only twice a day tend to be more destructive. They are also more afraid of new things and experiences. Many animal behaviorists believe that cats in this situation are more aggressive as they want their owners' attention. It is observed that cat owners who play with their furballs a minimum of five minutes per day are less likely to encounter behavioral problems.

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