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Your Puppy Vaccination Schedule

Breaking Down the Various Needed and Recommended Vaccines for Your New Puppy

By Madeleine Burry. July 11, 2013 | See Comments

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Your Puppy Vaccination Schedule

You have a new puppy! It's all fun from here, right? Well, all puppies need certain vaccines -- some even required by state law. Find out what your puppy will have to get, and when, with this handy calendar.

Beginning just a few weeks after your new puppy is born, several courses of vaccines will be required over a series of visits to your veterinarian. During the very first weeks of your puppy’s life, their immune system will be strengthened by their mom’s milk. This protection is only in place for a few weeks, however, which is why vaccinations need to commence early on. Your puppy’s vaccinations protect against common diseases and conditions, such as contagious, airborne viruses, and rabies, amongst other illnesses. Vaccines for puppies are helpful for both protecting your own dog and stopping the spread of disease to other dogs. Here’s the puppy vaccination schedule.

Which Vaccines Puppies Need

Based on guidelines from the American Animal Hospital Association, the vaccines your puppy is given are divided into two groups: core vaccines and non-core vaccines. Core vaccines are recommended for all dogs, and prevent against the most common potential diseases and conditions. Non-core vaccinations are given based on where your dog lives and the conditions your dog will live in. For instance, dogs that will frequently be around other dogs generally get the bordetella vaccination, which helps their immune system fight kennel cough.

Some vaccines are given in several doses, so your puppy will need to return to the vet several times to complete the course of vaccination.

Age of Puppy

Vaccines

6-8 weeks

Core Vaccines: The following 4 vaccines are usually given together in a vaccine named for each virus it protects against: DAPPV

  • Distemper -- an airborne virus
  • Adenovirus -- prevents canine hepatitis
  • Parvovirus -- this virus has vomiting and diarrhea as its main symptoms
  • Parainfluenza -- protects against this respiratory virus

Non-core vaccines that are also options at this point are:

  • Coronavirus -- an intestinal infection that can be contracted from fecal and oral matter. This vaccine can be given along with DAPPV to form a five-way vaccine.

9-12 weeks

Core Vaccines: The first 4 may be given as another DAPPV vaccine

  • Distemper -- an airborne virus
  • Parvovirus -- this virus has vomiting and diarrhea as its main symptoms
  • Adenovirus -- prevents canine hepatitis
  • Parainfluenza -- protects against this respiratory virus
  • Rabies -- generally required by state law, it is usually given once in the first year of life between 12-16 weeks of age then given every 3 years following

Non-core vaccines that are also options at this point are:

  • Coronavirus -- an intestinal infection that can be contracted from fecal and oral matter. This vaccine can be given along with DAPPV to form a five-way vaccine.
  • Lyme - prevents the tick-borne illness. This vaccine is recommended for dogs that live in tick-heavy areas. A set of two vaccines, the second is given 3-4 weeks later.
  • Leptospirosis - an infection that’s carried by wild animals, or standing water that infected animals have eliminated in. Given first between 12-14 weeks of age and again 3-4 weeks later.
  • Bordetella - kennel cough, a bacterial illness. Can be given as early as 10 weeks, but is usually given between 14-16
  • Canine Influenza -- protects dogs against the flu virus. A series of 2 vaccinations

13-16 weeks

Core Vaccines: These may be given as the last DAPPV vaccine

  • Distemper -- an airborne virus  
  • Parvovirus -- this virus has vomiting and diarrhea as its main symptoms
  • Adenovirus -- prevents canine hepatitis;
  • Parainfluenza -- protects against this respiratory virus

Non-core vaccines that are also options at this point are:

  • Lyme - the second of the vaccine set. Prevents the tick-borne illness and is recommended for dogs that live in tick-heavy areas.
  • Leptospirosis - an infection that’s carried by wild animals, or standing water that infected animals have eliminated in. Given first between 12-14 weeks of age and again 3-4 weeks later.
  • Bordetella - kennel cough, a bacterial illness. Can be given as early as 10 weeks, but is usually given around 14-16 weeks.
  • Canine Influenza -- protects dogs against the flu virus. The second of a series of 2 vaccinations

Adult

Every few years, your dog will need booster shots for the vaccinations given to them as a puppy. The first round of boosters generally occurs a year following the end of the puppy vaccinations, and then again every 3 years, per the recommendation of the American Animal Hospital Association. It’s especially important to update your dog’s rabies vaccines every 3 years, as this is required by law in most states.

 

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This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant as a substitute for the professional advice of, or diagnosis or treatment by, your veterinarian with respect to your pet. It has, however, been verified by a licensed veterinarian for accuracy.

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Puppy Vaccines at a glance

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  • 1All puppies will need some required vaccines, usually given in 3 sets, 3-4 weeks apart.
  • 2Optional non-core vaccines can protect your puppy from health concerns in your area, like Lyme disease.
  • 3Puppy vaccinations are often given in a combo vaccine, called the DAPPV.
  • 4Your dog will need booster shots a year after their first set, and then every three years.