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When to Remove the Undercoat of a Siberian Husky

About the Shedding, Undercoats, and Grooming Procedures for Huskies

By Team PetCareRx. July 09, 2012 | See Comments

When to Remove the Undercoat of a Siberian Husky

Huskies' coats keep them cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Along with this special coat comes special grooming needs. Learn more about your Husky's fur.

Siberian Huskies shed their undercoats twice a year. This is called "blowing the coat," and it usually occurs in spring as the weather warms, and again in fall to make way for growth of a new undercoat for the cold weather ahead. You should never have the undercoat of your Siberian Husky manually removed. In very warm climates such as Florida and Texas, the dogs may shed year-round. Regular grooming, not undercoat removal, is the secret to keeping your Siberian Husky clean and comfortable. In addition, it is important to never shave a Siberian Husky, as the coat provides natural insulation both against summer heat and winter cold, and it protects the Husky's skin from sunburn.

Grooming Tools

To keep your Siberian Husky's coat in top condition, you need certain tools. The most important of these is a slicker brush, which is a brush with a slanted head containing fine, metal pins set in a rubber cushion. The brush pulls dead hairs from the outer coat, while detangling mats in the undercoat. It stimulates the dog’s skin gently, removing any dander or dead skin cells from the skin and giving the coat a soft shine. The cushion effect protects the dog’s skin from pressure during brushing. Besides the slicker, you need a curry comb or rake, a spray bottle of water containing a little conditioner specially formulated for dogs, a portable hair dryer, nail clippers, and a small pair of scissors.

Process

Comb gently through the coat of your Siberian Husky, using the curry comb or another wide-toothed comb. Start at the head and work toward the dog’s tail, taking care not to pull any tangles. This combing removes the loose hair in both the undercoat and the outer hairs, and enables you to reach the skin. Follow this with a thorough brushing using the slicker tool, working along the dog’s body first against the direction of the hair growth, and then again following the hair direction. Spray the coat lightly with a fine mist of the conditioner and water solution and brush it through the coat as you work. Blow the coat dry as you brush, using the hair dryer on the lowest setting.

Cleaning

Siberian Huskies commonly groom themselves much as cats do. Their furry undercoats contain natural oils that help to repel dirt. This means Siberians generally need bathing just once or twice a year. More frequent bathing can dry out the natural oils, causing skin problems. Used regularly, the conditioner and water solution helps to clean the dog and leaves a fresh scent and a shine on the coat, as well as helping to loosen tangles. When it is necessary to bathe the dog, use a shampoo formulated for dogs. Rinse several times after bathing to remove any shampoo residue. Clean the inner surface of the dog’s ears, using a cotton ball soaked in mineral oil to help guard against ear mites.

Trimming

A Siberian Husky's coat doesn't need trimming, and what's more, cutting their hair can cause coat damage, damaging the way the coat protects the dogs from dirt and UV rays. The hair that grows between the toes to form hairy pads under the dog’s feet, however, are sometimes trimmed because they're considered unsightly. Carefully trim the hairs on the dog’s toes, using the scissors. Trim the hairs growing out between the pads on the underside of the foot so that the feet have a neat appearance.

References & Resources

South Florida Siberian Husky Rescue, Inc.: Siberian Husky Coat and Grooming
Siberians Needing Owners: Shedding

This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant as a substitute for the professional advice of, or diagnosis or treatment by, your veterinarian. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian or other qualified professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard or delay seeking professional advice due to what you may have read on our website.

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