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Compare: Advantage II vs Frontline for Dogs

Top of the Line Flea and Tick Protection

By Lauren Leonardi. August 21, 2013 | See Comments

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Compare: Advantage II vs Frontline for Dogs

When it comes to dealing with fleas and ticks, the best answer is prevention. Here, we compare two of the best protection products on the market to help you decide which one is right for your dog, based on their lifestyle and where you live.

Sooner or later most dogs get a case of the creepy crawlies. Fleas, ticks, and other pests are all attracted to our four legged friends. Fortunately for us, products like Advantage II for Dogs and Frontline Plus for Dogs provide us with a powerful weapon against pests. So when you’re deciding between Advantage II and Frontline for your dog, what should you know?

When choosing one of these products, consider their particular advantages as well as your pet’s lifestyle and location.

Advantage II for Dogs

Fleas reproduce very quickly, which is why the makers of Advantage II for Dogs have included a few different parasite control agents in their formulation. Once Advantage II is applied to your dog’s coat, the contact formula begins killing adult fleas within 12 hours. Any fleas that re-infest are killed in the following 2 hours.

After that, a second ingredient in Advantage II, a flea growth inhibitor, starts to work. This growth inhibitor interferes with the viability of flea eggs, killing them before they hatch. Advantage II for Dogs works for a full month after each application.

This product is also effective against lice. In addition, because Advantage II is waterproof, reapplication isn’t necessary after baths or if your dog goes swimming.

This product should only be used on dogs and puppies that are at least 7 weeks old.

Frontline Plus for Dogs

When Meriel, the makers of Frontline products, replaced Frontline with Frontline Plus, they also added a growth inhibitor to their product. Thus, Frontline Plus is effective for a full month after application and also works to interrupt the flea lifecycle.

Frontline Plus begins to kill adult pests within 24 hours of application. This includes the killing of fleas as well as chewing lice and the dreaded carriers of Lyme disease, ticks.

Since Frontline Plus is waterproof, dogs who swim will stay protected. You won’t have to reapply after bathing your dog either.

You can begin to treat your dog with Frontline Plus when he or she is 8 weeks of age or older.

Which Product is Best for Your Dog?

These leading brands are at the top of the list for pest control, and are relatively similar, with a few key exceptions. Some tests have shown that Frontline kills live adult fleas more quickly than Advantage, but only by a few hours.

Another consideration when choosing between Frontline Plus and Advantage II for Dogs is your pet’s risk of exposure. Are you in an area that has a high tick population? Does your dog go outside a lot in these areas? If so, you might consider Frontline Plus. If your area doesn’t have a tick problem, or if your dog is mostly a homebody, then you may prefer Advantage II, which has a simpler formula.

Get advice from your vet as to which product he or she thinks would be best for your dog. Also, be sure to discuss any health conditions your dog has and whether that might affect your use of parasite control products.

 

Application

Pests controlled

Waterproof?

Recommended age of application

Advantage II

Effective 1 month; kills fleas within 12 hours

Adult fleas, flea larvae and eggs; chewing lice

Yes

7 weeks and older

Frontline Plus

Effective 1 month; kills pests within 24 hours

Adult fleas, flea larvae and eggs; chewing lice; ticks

Yes

8 weeks and older

 

More on Fleas and Ticks

25 Startling Flea and Tick Facts
Understanding Fleas and Ticks
Get Rid of Fleas In 8 Steps - Infographic

This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant as a substitute for the professional advice of, or diagnosis or treatment by, your veterinarian with respect to your pet. It has, however, been verified by a licensed veterinarian for accuracy.

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