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Are Blue Cats Really Blue?

And How Many Types of Blue Cats Are There?

By Sora Wondra. June 13, 2013 | See Comments

Are Blue Cats Really Blue?

There's something uniquely beautiful about a blue cat -- their grey-silver fur has a lovely blue sheen. What types of cats have this blue coat? Find out here.

You may have heard of the Russian Blue cat breed—and realized that they aren't really blue. The “blue” actually means a gray color, but sometimes these lovely cats have a bit of a blue sheen to their fur. So what makes a blue cat blue?

Some of the following breeds, like the Russian Blue, have been used to cross-breed, so many gray-colored cats out there may have some lineage of an all-blue breed. 

Many blue-gray cats look similar, but the following pure-bred blue cats originated in several different regions of the world. They have different body structures, coats, grooming needs, and personalities. If you know what to look for, you will notice the key differences in these breeds. 

If you love the blue color, but don't know which breed is your favorite, read on! The first four only come in blue, but the British Shorthair can have coats in a variety of colors, although it was originally blue.

Russian Blue

Russian Blue cats (pictured above) may be the most commonly known blue cat, especially with “blue” in their name. They are fine-boned, muscular, and graceful, with a short and thick double-coat which is very soft. Their distinctive high ears make them easier to distinguish from other blue cats. Russian Blues can be very affectionate with their family, especially one “special person” they cling to, but are reserved and shy with strangers. They don't need much grooming to maintain their coat, but they do need a routine to feel safe—they aren't big fans of surprises.

Chartreux

These French cats have bright yellow or gold eyes and a big, strong body. Their solid bodies are covered in a medium-short woolly coat which is heavier for males than females. These cats love spending every possible moment of the day with their pet parents, and tend to follow them around the house, waiting to cuddle. Their coat color can vary from ash to slate and only needs weekly grooming to maintain. If you happen to have a mouse problem, this is a great cat for you.


Korat

Korat cats come from Thailand, and while they are related to Siamese cats, they are quieter and usually more affectionate. These cats love attention and feeling like they are the leader of the family. They are gentle with children and like being close to their pet parents. Being so smart and social, Korats don't like to be left alone for long periods of time. Their body is a little different, with a broad chest and front legs which are slightly shorter than back legs. They have a single coat of short hair which is often silver tipped.


Nebelung

Nebelungs are a very recent and rare blue breed from Germany, their name meaning “creature of the mist.” These silky, long-haired cats have a distinctively thick tail and a slim yet strong body. They can be cuddly and affectionate once they get used to new surroundings and people, but have the tendency towards shyness. Despite their longer hair, they don't require much grooming.




British Shorthair

This sturdy, round, easy-going cat is not always blue, but was once known as the “British Blue” when coat colors were limited to blue. Shorthairs, as their name suggests, have a short, very dense single coat which is firm to the touch but not waxy or woolly. They shed more than the other blue cats, especially in the spring, so they need brushing or combing a few times a week. British Shorthairs aren't great lapcats, but once they get to know their families they can be affectionate. Females tend to be more serious than males, but both get along well with children and other animals in the home.

More on Cats

Cats 101
Easiest Cats to Care For
Getting the Right Kitten Vaccinations

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