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A Comprehensive Guide to Managing Cat Arthritis

Everything You Need to Know When Dealing with Feline Arthritis

By Sam Bourne. October 11, 2013 | See Comments

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    PetCareRx Staff Veterinarian

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cat-arthritis

Cats get arthritis just like anyone else -- they age and their joints start to deteriorate, unable to restore the lost cartilage that would otherwise cushion their joints from bone on bone contact. If you notice that you cat is starting to show signs of this aging, here are a few articles to help your formerly spry kitty deal with their arthritis.

Arthritis happens. Cats get older, just like all of us, and when they do, the moving parts start to show signs of fatigue. However, since the life expectancy of a cat is substantially shorter than that of a human, the onset of their arthritis might seem a bit more abrupt -- one day they are leaping off counter tops, and the next they can barely get off the sofa. When it does happen, it is good to know what you are in for, and what you can do to help.

Thankfully, we here at PetCareRx have been compiling oodles of information on the subject. Here's everything you need to know to better understand your cat’s condition.

arthritis in cats 101

As cats age, their ability to repair the cartilage in their joints diminishes, resulting in osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis in pets. When this happens, it can help to know the symptoms (difficulty walking, atrophy in a single leg, etc), and what you can do to help ease their pain (light exercise, certain NSAID type drugs, corticosteroids).

Containing pretty much everything you need to know, from causes to treatments, this handy article is a great reference sheet for edifying yourself on the ins and outs of your pet's condition.

Hip Dysplasia in Cats

A preexisting condition likely to increase your cat’s odds of developing arthritis, hip dysplasia is often not diagnosed until the damage has been done. While it may be a primarily inherited trait, it can be exacerbated by being overweight, and there is no cure, so it is a good idea to be on the lookout for this syndrome.

This series of articles has everything you need to know about hip dysplasia, helping to prepare you against all its potential ravages, from causes and symptoms to treatment and tips.

nutrition for arthritic cats

Part of managing your cat’s arthritis, like many other ailments, comes down to diet. Helping your kitty shed some pounds, along with giving some supplements to help support the cartilage surrounding their joints, are key to helping improve your cat’s condition.

This article gives a detailed overview of steps you can be taking to help offset the otherwise rapid deterioration of your cat’s mobility.

joint health products for pets with arthritis

Need help figuring out what kind of supplements your arthritic cat should be taking? Confused by all the different options for vitamins and food that are out there?

Depending on your cat’s specific condition, some types of treatment might be more effective than others, which is why we compiled this buying guide to help you sift through the sea of available products.

chondroitin and glucosamine for dogs and cats

Chondroitin and glucosamine are two popular supplements used to help cope with arthritis -- chondroitin helping to keep cartilage from deteriorating further, and glucosamine helping to keep the joints moving smoothly.

This article explains the mechanisms behind these treatments, how to use them, and why it pays to take them together.

And that's it, for now. Keep checking back, though, as any new article that comes out on the subject of cat arthritis is going to be included in this roundup, and there are sure to be a bunch more on the horizon.

More on Cat Care

When to Take a Cat to the Vet
Antibiotics for Cats
All About Cat Hairballs

This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant as a substitute for the professional advice of, or diagnosis or treatment by, your veterinarian with respect to your pet. It has, however, been verified by a licensed veterinarian for accuracy.

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